Influence of motor imagery on spinal reflex excitability of multiple muscles

Kento Nakagawa, Yohei Masugi, Akira Saito, Hiroki Obata, Kimitaka Nakazawa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The effects of motor imagery on spinal reflexes such as the H-reflex are unclear. One reason for this is that the muscles that can be used to record spinal reflexes are limited to traditional evoking methods Recently, transcutaneous spinal cord stimulation has been used for inducing spinal reflexes from multiple muscles and we aimed to examine the effect of motor imagery on spinal reflexes from multiple muscles. Spinal reflexes evoked by transcutaneous spinal cord stimulation were recorded from six muscles from lower limbs during motor imagery of right wrist extension and ankle plantarflexion with maximum isometric contraction. During both imaginary tasks, facilitation of spinal reflexes was detected in the ankle ipsilateral plantarflexor and dorsiflexor muscles, but not in thigh, toe or contralateral lower limb muscles. These results suggest that motor imagery of isometric contraction facilitates spinal reflex excitability in muscles of the ipsilateral lower leg and the facilitation does not correspond to the imaginary involved muscles.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)55-59
Number of pages5
JournalNeuroscience Letters
Volume668
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018 Mar 6
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Imagery (Psychotherapy)
Reflex
Muscles
Spinal Cord Stimulation
Isometric Contraction
Ankle
Lower Extremity
H-Reflex
Toes
Thigh
Wrist
Leg

Keywords

  • Motor imagery
  • Spinal reflex
  • Transcutaneous spinal cord stimulation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Influence of motor imagery on spinal reflex excitability of multiple muscles. / Nakagawa, Kento; Masugi, Yohei; Saito, Akira; Obata, Hiroki; Nakazawa, Kimitaka.

In: Neuroscience Letters, Vol. 668, 06.03.2018, p. 55-59.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Nakagawa, Kento ; Masugi, Yohei ; Saito, Akira ; Obata, Hiroki ; Nakazawa, Kimitaka. / Influence of motor imagery on spinal reflex excitability of multiple muscles. In: Neuroscience Letters. 2018 ; Vol. 668. pp. 55-59.
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