Influence of recovery intensity on oxygen demand and repeated sprint performance

Takaki Yamagishi, John Babraj

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: This study aimed to determine effects of recovery intensity (passive, 20%, 30% and 40% Vo2peak) on oxygen uptake kinetics, performance and blood lactate accumulation during repeated sprints. MeThodS: Seven moderately-trained male participants (V o2peak: 48.1±5.1 ml/kg/min) performed four 30-second repeated Wingate tests on four separate occasions. Results: recovery of Vo2 between sprints was prolonged with recovery intensity (time required to reach 50% V o2peak: passive: 50±9 s; 20%: 81±17 s; 30%: 130±43 s; 40%: 188±62 s, p<0.001), while V o2-to-sprint work ratio was mainly increased by the higher intensities (passive: 138±17 ml/min/kJ; 20%: 149±14 ml/min/kJ; 30%: 159±15 ml/min/kJ; 40%: 158±17 ml/min/kJ, p=0.001). The decline in peak power tended to be greater in the higher intensity conditions during sprint 2 (passive: 7.4±5.4%; 20%: 5.8±7.9%; 30%: 12.7±7.4%; 40%: 12.7±5.5%, p=0.052), whereas average power was less decreased with recovery intensity during sprint 4 (passive: 22.4±8.9%; 20%: 19.9±6.1%; 30%: 18.4±7.3%; 40%: 16.6±6.2%, p=0.036). Blood lactate was not different with recovery intensity (p=0.251). coNcluSioNS: The present study demonstrated that while the higher recovery intensities induce prolonged oxygen recovery and impaired peak power restoration during the initial sprints, those intensities provide a greater aerobic contribution to sprint performance, resulting in better power maintenance during the latter sprints.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1103-1112
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness
Volume56
Issue number10
Publication statusPublished - 2016 Oct 1
Externally publishedYes

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Lactic Acid
Oxygen
Maintenance

Keywords

  • Anaerobic exercise
  • Athletic performance
  • Ergometry
  • Exercise
  • Exercise test

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

Cite this

Influence of recovery intensity on oxygen demand and repeated sprint performance. / Yamagishi, Takaki; Babraj, John.

In: Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness, Vol. 56, No. 10, 01.10.2016, p. 1103-1112.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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