Input of seabird-derived nitrogen into rice-paddy fields near a breeding/roosting colony of the Great Cormorant (Phalacrocorax carbo), and its effects on wild grass

Kentaro Kazama, Hirotatsu Murano, Kazuhide Tsuzuki, Hidenori Fujii, Yasuaki Niizuma, Chitoshi Mizota

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Terrestrial ecosystems near breeding/roosting colonies of piscivorous seabirds can receive a large amount of marine-derived N in the form of bird feces. It has been well demonstrated that N input from seabirds strongly affects plant communities in forests or coastal grasslands. The effects of nutrient input on plant communities in agricultural ecosystems near seabird colonies, however, have rarely been evaluated. This relationship was examined in rice-paddy fields irrigated by a pond system located near a colony of the Great Cormorant Phalacrocorax carbo in Aichi, central Japan. In the present study, spatial variations in N content (N %) and N stable isotope composition (δ15N) of soils and wild grass species together with the growth height of plants in paddy fields in early spring (fallow period) were examined. Soils had a higher N % and δ15N values in fields associated with an irrigation pond that had N input from cormorants. The δ15N values tended to be higher around the inlet of irrigation waters, relative to the outlet. These results indicate that cormorant-derived N was input into the paddy fields via the irrigation systems. Plants growing in soil with higher δ15N had higher δ15N in the above-ground part of the plants and had luxurious growth. A positive correlation in plant height and δ15N of NO3-N was observed in soil plough horizons.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)128-134
Number of pages7
JournalApplied Geochemistry
Volume28
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013 Jan 1
Externally publishedYes

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roosting
Charcoal
seabird
paddy field
Nitrogen
rice
Irrigation
breeding
grass
Soils
nitrogen
Ponds
Ecosystems
plant community
pond
irrigation
soil
Birds
agricultural ecosystem
soil horizon

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Chemistry
  • Pollution
  • Geochemistry and Petrology

Cite this

Input of seabird-derived nitrogen into rice-paddy fields near a breeding/roosting colony of the Great Cormorant (Phalacrocorax carbo), and its effects on wild grass. / Kazama, Kentaro; Murano, Hirotatsu; Tsuzuki, Kazuhide; Fujii, Hidenori; Niizuma, Yasuaki; Mizota, Chitoshi.

In: Applied Geochemistry, Vol. 28, 01.01.2013, p. 128-134.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kazama, Kentaro ; Murano, Hirotatsu ; Tsuzuki, Kazuhide ; Fujii, Hidenori ; Niizuma, Yasuaki ; Mizota, Chitoshi. / Input of seabird-derived nitrogen into rice-paddy fields near a breeding/roosting colony of the Great Cormorant (Phalacrocorax carbo), and its effects on wild grass. In: Applied Geochemistry. 2013 ; Vol. 28. pp. 128-134.
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