Insomnia as a risk for depression: A longitudinal epidemiologic study on a Japanese rural cohort

Isa Okajima, Yoko Komada, Takashi Nomura, Kenji Nakashima, Yuichi Inoue

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

37 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: To determine (1) whether insomnia is a factor related to the presence or persistence of depression for 2 years in the Japanese population and (2) which component of insomnia is associated with the presence of depression for 2 years in a rural cohort. Method: This is a community-based longitudinal study. Two thousand eight hundred twenty-five people aged 20 years or older were evaluated at baseline, and of those participants, 1,577 (56%) were reevaluated after 2 years. During both surveys, the participants were asked to describe demographic variables and to fill out self-rating scales of insomnia (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index [PSQI]) and depressive symptoms (Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale). Results: The results of a multiple logistic regression analysis showed that depression (OR = 6.0; 95% CI, 4.4-8.0) and insomnia (OR = 2.1; 95% CI, 1.5-2.8) at baseline were significantly associated with the presence of depression at the follow-up. Most of the PSQI subscales, except for sleep duration and habitual sleep efficiency, were significantly associated (P < .01) with the presence of depression at the follow-up. In addition, the new appearance and repeated existence of depression at the follow-up were related to persistent insomnia (adjusted ORs = 7.0 and 3.3 [P < .001], respectively). A result of the receiver operating characteristic curve showed that persons with insomnia whose PSQI scores exceeded 8 points at the baseline were most likely to still have insomnia at the follow-up (cutoff point = 7.5). Conclusions: On the basis of our results in a Japanese population, insomnia with high severity level could be a risk factor for the presence/persistence of depression in the long-term prognosis.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)377-383
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Clinical Psychiatry
Volume73
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012 Mar
Externally publishedYes

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Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders
Longitudinal Studies
Epidemiologic Studies
Depression
Sleep
Longitudinal Study
Cohort
ROC Curve
Population
Logistic Models
Regression Analysis
Demography
Pittsburgh

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Insomnia as a risk for depression : A longitudinal epidemiologic study on a Japanese rural cohort. / Okajima, Isa; Komada, Yoko; Nomura, Takashi; Nakashima, Kenji; Inoue, Yuichi.

In: Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, Vol. 73, No. 3, 03.2012, p. 377-383.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Okajima, Isa ; Komada, Yoko ; Nomura, Takashi ; Nakashima, Kenji ; Inoue, Yuichi. / Insomnia as a risk for depression : A longitudinal epidemiologic study on a Japanese rural cohort. In: Journal of Clinical Psychiatry. 2012 ; Vol. 73, No. 3. pp. 377-383.
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