Interplay between DNA methylation, histone modification and chromatin remodeling in stem cells and during development

Kohta Ikegami, Jun Ohgane, Satoshi Tanaka, Shintaro Yagi, Kunio Shiota

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

84 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Genes constitute only a small proportion of the mammalian genome, the majority of which is composed of non-genic repetitive elements including interspersed repeats and satellites. A unique feature of the mammalian genome is that there are numerous tissue-dependent, differentially methylated regions (T-DMRs) in the non-repetitive sequences, which include genes and their regulatory elements. The epigenetic status of T-DMRs varies from that of repetitive elements and constitutes the DNA methylation profile genome-wide. Since the DNA methylation profile is specific to each cell and tissue type, much like a fingerprint, it can be used as a means of identification. The formation of DNA methylation profiles is the basis for cell differentiation and development in mammals. The epigenetic status of each T-DMR is regulated by the interplay between DNA methyltransferases, histone modification enzymes, histone subtypes, non-histone nuclear proteins and non-coding RNAs. In this review, we will discuss how these epigenetic factors cooperate to establish cell- and tissue-specific DNA methylation profiles.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)203-214
Number of pages12
JournalInternational Journal of Developmental Biology
Volume53
Issue number2-3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Histone Code
Chromatin Assembly and Disassembly
DNA Methylation
Stem Cells
Epigenomics
Genome
Interspersed Repetitive Sequences
Untranslated RNA
Nucleic Acid Repetitive Sequences
Methyltransferases
Dermatoglyphics
Regulator Genes
Nuclear Proteins
Histones
Cell Differentiation
Mammals
DNA
Enzymes
Genes

Keywords

  • Chromatin remodeling
  • DNA methylation
  • Epigenetics
  • Histone modification
  • T-DMR

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental Biology
  • Embryology
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Interplay between DNA methylation, histone modification and chromatin remodeling in stem cells and during development. / Ikegami, Kohta; Ohgane, Jun; Tanaka, Satoshi; Yagi, Shintaro; Shiota, Kunio.

In: International Journal of Developmental Biology, Vol. 53, No. 2-3, 2009, p. 203-214.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Ikegami, Kohta ; Ohgane, Jun ; Tanaka, Satoshi ; Yagi, Shintaro ; Shiota, Kunio. / Interplay between DNA methylation, histone modification and chromatin remodeling in stem cells and during development. In: International Journal of Developmental Biology. 2009 ; Vol. 53, No. 2-3. pp. 203-214.
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