Inverse roles of emotional labour on health and job satisfaction among long-term care workers in Japan

Erika Tsukamoto, Takeru Abe, Michikazu Ono

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    3 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Emotional labour increases among long-term care workers because providing care and services to impaired elders causes conflicting interpersonal emotions. Thus, we investigated the associations between emotional labour, general health and job satisfaction among long-term care workers. We conducted a cross-sectional study among 132 established, private day care centres in Tokyo using a mail survey. The outcome variables included two health-related variables and four job satisfaction variables: physical and psychological health, satisfaction with wages, interpersonal relationships, work environment and job satisfaction. We performed multiple regression analyses to identify significant factors. Directors from 36 facilities agreed to participate. A total of 123 responses from long-term care workers were analysed. Greater emotional dissonance was associated with better physical and psychological health and worse work environment satisfaction (partial regression coefficient: −2.93, p = .0389; −3.32, p = .0299; −1.92, p = .0314, respectively). Fewer negative emotions were associated with more job satisfaction (partial regression coefficient: −1.87, p = .0163). We found that emotional labour was significantly inversely associated with health and job satisfaction. Our findings indicated that the emotional labour of long-term care workers has a negative and positive influence on health and workplace satisfaction, and suggests that care quality and stable employment among long-term care workers might affect their emotional labour. Therefore, we think a programme to support emotional labour among long-term care workers in an organized manner and a self-care programme to educate workers regarding emotional labour would be beneficial.

    Original languageEnglish
    JournalPsychology, Health and Medicine
    DOIs
    Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2014 Sep 27

    Fingerprint

    Job Satisfaction
    Long-Term Care
    Japan
    Health
    Emotions
    Psychology
    Tokyo
    Quality of Health Care
    Salaries and Fringe Benefits
    Postal Service
    Self Care
    Workplace
    Cross-Sectional Studies
    Regression Analysis

    Keywords

    • emotional labour
    • health
    • job satisfaction
    • long-term care workers
    • quality of care

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Psychiatry and Mental health
    • Clinical Psychology
    • Applied Psychology

    Cite this

    Inverse roles of emotional labour on health and job satisfaction among long-term care workers in Japan. / Tsukamoto, Erika; Abe, Takeru; Ono, Michikazu.

    In: Psychology, Health and Medicine, 27.09.2014.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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