Inverted-U and Inverted-J Effects in Self-Referenced Decisions

Kenpei Shiina*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Rating one's own personality traits is a common self-referential information processing task. The current paper examined the mechanism underlying this sort of trait-rating task by using a PC cursor tracing technique (Shiina, 2011a, b). The target phenomenon of interest was the inverted-U effect observed in trait ratings. The PC cursor tracing technique analyzed response times, tangential velocities, and rapid cursor movements (strokes). Results supported Klein's notion (Klein et al., 2002) that self-referenced episodic and semantic memories are used independently when making these trait decisions.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 36th Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Science Society, CogSci 2014
PublisherThe Cognitive Science Society
Pages2919-2924
Number of pages6
ISBN (Electronic)9780991196708
Publication statusPublished - 2014
Event36th Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Science Society, CogSci 2014 - Quebec City, Canada
Duration: 2014 Jul 232014 Jul 26

Publication series

NameProceedings of the 36th Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Science Society, CogSci 2014

Conference

Conference36th Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Science Society, CogSci 2014
Country/TerritoryCanada
CityQuebec City
Period14/7/2314/7/26

Keywords

  • decisional fluctuation
  • inverted-U effect
  • Rating decision

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Artificial Intelligence
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Cognitive Neuroscience

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