Jogging therapy for hikikomori social withdrawal and increased cerebral hemodynamics: A case report

Masaki Nishida, Senichiro Kikuchi, Kazuhito Fukuda, Satoshi Kato

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Severe social withdrawal, called hikikomori, has drawn increased public attention. However, an optimal clinical approach and strategy of treatment has not been well established. Here, we report a case of hikikomori for which an exercise intervention using jogging therapy was effective, showing cerebral hemodynamic improvement. The patient was a 20 year old Japanese male who was hospitalized in order to evaluate and treat severe social withdrawal. Although depressive and anxiety symptoms partially subsided with sertraline alone, social withdrawal persisted due to a lack of self confidence. With his consent, we implemented exercise therapy with 30 minutes of jogging three times a week for three months. We did not change the pharmacotherapy, and his social withdrawal remarkably improved with continuous jogging exercise. Using near infrared spectroscopy to evaluate hemodynamic alteration, bilateral temporal hemodynamics considerably increased after the three-month jogging therapy. Regarding exercise therapy for mental illness, numerous studies have reported the effectiveness of exercise therapy for major depression. This case implied, however, that the applicability of exercise therapy is not limited to major depressive disorder. Jogging therapy may contribute to reinforcing self confidence associated with "resilience" in conjunction with neurophysiological modulation of neural networks.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)38-42
Number of pages5
JournalClinical Practice and Epidemiology in Mental Health
Volume12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016 Apr 1
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Jogging
Exercise Therapy
Hemodynamics
Exercise
Depression
Therapeutics
Sertraline
Near-Infrared Spectroscopy
Major Depressive Disorder
Anxiety
Drug Therapy

Keywords

  • Actigraphy
  • Hemodynamics
  • Hikikomori
  • Jogging
  • Near-infrared spectroscopy
  • Social withdrawal

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Jogging therapy for hikikomori social withdrawal and increased cerebral hemodynamics : A case report. / Nishida, Masaki; Kikuchi, Senichiro; Fukuda, Kazuhito; Kato, Satoshi.

In: Clinical Practice and Epidemiology in Mental Health, Vol. 12, 01.04.2016, p. 38-42.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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