Joint associations of leisure screen time and physical activity with academic performance in a sample of Japanese children

Kaori Ishii, Kenryu Aoyagi, Ai Shibata, Mohammad Javad Koohsari, Alison Carver, Koichiro Oka

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Studies have shown the potential effects of sedentary behavior and physical activity on not only physical and mental health but also academic performance in children. Nevertheless, studies have only focused on either sedentary behavior or physical activity. Examining the joint effects of both behaviors on academic performance provides detailed insights into the patterns of these behaviors in relation to children’s academic achievement. The present study investigated the joint longitudinal associations of physical activity and screen time with academic performance among Japanese children. The screen time and physical activity of 261 children aged 7–10 years were assessed, and their academic performance was evaluated one year later. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to examine the joint associations of screen time and physical activity with academic performance adjusted for demographic characteristics. Children with low screen time and physical activity had 2.04 (95% confidence interval: 1.11–3.78) times greater odds of having high academic performance compared to children with high screen time and low physical activity, while children with low screen time and high physical activity had 2.75 (1.17–6.43) times greater odds (boys; 4.12 (1.19–14.24)). Low screen time was related to high academic performance after one year, regardless of the physical activity level.

Original languageEnglish
Article number757
JournalInternational journal of environmental research and public health
Volume17
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2020 Feb 1

Keywords

  • Academic outcome
  • Active lifestyle
  • Children
  • Elementary school
  • Screen time
  • Sedentary behavior

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Joint associations of leisure screen time and physical activity with academic performance in a sample of Japanese children'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this