Lesser evil? Public opinion on regulating fake news in Japan, South Korea, and Thailand – A three-country comparison

John W. Cheng, Hitoshi Mitomo, Artima Kamplean, Youngkyoung Seo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This study quantitatively examines and compares public opinion on regulating fake news, and factors affecting the opinion in three Asian countries: Japan, South Korea, and Thailand. Based on the third-person effect, it is hypothesised that the perceived harm of fake news on society increases people's support for fake news regulation. In parallel, according to the lesser evil principle, it is also anticipated that people will be less supportive of regulating fake news if they are aware that there are other non-regulatory counter fake news solutions such as fact-checking. Using original survey data collected from the three countries (n = 5218) and multi-group SEM, it is found that while the first hypothesis holds for all three countries, the second one holds only for Japan and South Korea (the two mature democracies), but not for Thailand (the semi-democratic country). This finding implies that the lesser evil principle also applies in Asian countries, but only in mature democracies where freedom of speech is protected.

Original languageEnglish
Article number102185
JournalTelecommunications Policy
Volume45
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2021 Oct

Keywords

  • Fake news
  • Fake news regulation
  • Lesser evil
  • Multi-group SEM
  • Public opinion
  • Third-person effect

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Human Factors and Ergonomics
  • Information Systems
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

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