Lymphoid Tissue–Resident Alcaligenes Establish an Intracellular Symbiotic Environment by Creating a Unique Energy Shift in Dendritic Cells

Koji Hosomi, Naoko Shibata, Atsushi Shimoyama, Tomoya Uto, Takahiro Nagatake, Yoko Tojima, Tomomi Nishino, Haruko Takeyama, Koichi Fukase, Hiroshi Kiyono, Jun Kunisawa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Lymphoid-tissue–resident commensal bacteria (LRCs), including Alcaligenes faecalis, are present in intestinal lymphoid tissue including the Peyer’s patches (PPs) of mammals and modulate the host immune system. Although LRCs can colonize within dendritic cells (DCs), the mechanisms through which LRCs persist in DCs and the symbiotic relationships between LRCs and DCs remain to be investigated. Here, we show an intracellular symbiotic system in which the LRC Alcaligenes creates a unique energy shift in DCs. Whereas DCs showed low mitochondrial respiration when they were co-cultured with Escherichia coli, DCs carrying A. faecalis maintained increased mitochondrial respiration. Furthermore, E. coli induced apoptosis of DCs but A. faecalis did not. Regarding an underlying mechanism, A. faecalis—unlike E. coli—did not induce intracellular nitric oxide (NO) production in DCs due to the low activity of its lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Therefore, A. faecalis, an example of LRCs, may persist within intestinal lymphoid tissue because they elicit little NO production in DCs. In addition, the symbiotic DCs exhibit characteristic physiologic changes, including a low rate of apoptosis and increased mitochondrial respiration.

Original languageEnglish
Article number561005
JournalFrontiers in Microbiology
Volume11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2020 Sep 24

Keywords

  • apoptosis
  • dendritic cells
  • inducible nitric oxide synmase
  • lipopolysaccharid
  • lymphoid-tissue-resident commensal bacteria
  • mitochondrial respiration

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology
  • Microbiology (medical)

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Lymphoid Tissue–Resident Alcaligenes Establish an Intracellular Symbiotic Environment by Creating a Unique Energy Shift in Dendritic Cells'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this