Major Anaerobic Bacteria Responsible for the Production of Carcinogenic Acetaldehyde from Ethanol in the Colon and Rectum

Atsuki Tsuruya, Akika Kuwahara, Yuta Saito, Haruhiko Yamaguchi, Natsuki Tenma, Makoto Inai, Seiji Takahashi, Eri Tsutsumi, Yoshihide Suwa, Yukari Totsuka, Wataru Suda, Kenshiro Oshima, Masahira Hattori, Takeshi Mizukami, Akira Yokoyama, Takefumi Shimoyama, Toru Nakayama

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

AIMS: The importance of ethanol oxidation by intestinal aerobes and facultative anaerobes under aerobic conditions in the pathogenesis of ethanol-related colorectal cancer has been proposed. However, the role of obligate anaerobes therein remains to be established, and it is still unclear which bacterial species, if any, are most important in the production and/or elimination of carcinogenic acetaldehyde under such conditions. This study was undertaken to address these issues.

METHODS: More than 500 bacterial strains were isolated from the faeces of Japanese alcoholics and phylogenetically characterized, and their aerobic ethanol metabolism was studied in vitro to examine their ability to accumulate acetaldehyde beyond the minimum mutagenic concentration (MMC, 50 µM).

RESULTS: Bacterial strains that were considered to potentially accumulate acetaldehyde beyond the MMC under aerobic conditions in the colon and rectum were identified and referred to as 'potential acetaldehyde accumulators' (PAAs). Ruminococcus, an obligate anaerobe, was identified as a genus that includes a large number of PAAs. Other obligate anaerobes were also found to include PAAs. The accumulation of acetaldehyde by PAAs colonizing the colorectal mucosal surface could be described, at least in part, as the response of PAAs to oxidative stress.

CONCLUSION: Ethanol oxidation by intestinal obligate anaerobes under aerobic conditions in the colon and rectum could also play an important role in the pathogenesis of ethanol-related colorectal cancer.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)395-401
Number of pages7
JournalAlcohol and alcoholism (Oxford, Oxfordshire)
Volume51
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016 Jul 1
Externally publishedYes

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Acetaldehyde
Anaerobic Bacteria
Rectum
Bacteria
Colon
Ethanol
Colorectal Neoplasms
Ruminococcus
Oxidation
Oxidative stress
Alcoholics
Metabolism
Feces
Oxidative Stress

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Medicine(all)
  • Toxicology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Major Anaerobic Bacteria Responsible for the Production of Carcinogenic Acetaldehyde from Ethanol in the Colon and Rectum. / Tsuruya, Atsuki; Kuwahara, Akika; Saito, Yuta; Yamaguchi, Haruhiko; Tenma, Natsuki; Inai, Makoto; Takahashi, Seiji; Tsutsumi, Eri; Suwa, Yoshihide; Totsuka, Yukari; Suda, Wataru; Oshima, Kenshiro; Hattori, Masahira; Mizukami, Takeshi; Yokoyama, Akira; Shimoyama, Takefumi; Nakayama, Toru.

In: Alcohol and alcoholism (Oxford, Oxfordshire), Vol. 51, No. 4, 01.07.2016, p. 395-401.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tsuruya, A, Kuwahara, A, Saito, Y, Yamaguchi, H, Tenma, N, Inai, M, Takahashi, S, Tsutsumi, E, Suwa, Y, Totsuka, Y, Suda, W, Oshima, K, Hattori, M, Mizukami, T, Yokoyama, A, Shimoyama, T & Nakayama, T 2016, 'Major Anaerobic Bacteria Responsible for the Production of Carcinogenic Acetaldehyde from Ethanol in the Colon and Rectum', Alcohol and alcoholism (Oxford, Oxfordshire), vol. 51, no. 4, pp. 395-401. https://doi.org/10.1093/alcalc/agv135
Tsuruya, Atsuki ; Kuwahara, Akika ; Saito, Yuta ; Yamaguchi, Haruhiko ; Tenma, Natsuki ; Inai, Makoto ; Takahashi, Seiji ; Tsutsumi, Eri ; Suwa, Yoshihide ; Totsuka, Yukari ; Suda, Wataru ; Oshima, Kenshiro ; Hattori, Masahira ; Mizukami, Takeshi ; Yokoyama, Akira ; Shimoyama, Takefumi ; Nakayama, Toru. / Major Anaerobic Bacteria Responsible for the Production of Carcinogenic Acetaldehyde from Ethanol in the Colon and Rectum. In: Alcohol and alcoholism (Oxford, Oxfordshire). 2016 ; Vol. 51, No. 4. pp. 395-401.
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AU - Saito, Yuta

AU - Yamaguchi, Haruhiko

AU - Tenma, Natsuki

AU - Inai, Makoto

AU - Takahashi, Seiji

AU - Tsutsumi, Eri

AU - Suwa, Yoshihide

AU - Totsuka, Yukari

AU - Suda, Wataru

AU - Oshima, Kenshiro

AU - Hattori, Masahira

AU - Mizukami, Takeshi

AU - Yokoyama, Akira

AU - Shimoyama, Takefumi

AU - Nakayama, Toru

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N2 - AIMS: The importance of ethanol oxidation by intestinal aerobes and facultative anaerobes under aerobic conditions in the pathogenesis of ethanol-related colorectal cancer has been proposed. However, the role of obligate anaerobes therein remains to be established, and it is still unclear which bacterial species, if any, are most important in the production and/or elimination of carcinogenic acetaldehyde under such conditions. This study was undertaken to address these issues.METHODS: More than 500 bacterial strains were isolated from the faeces of Japanese alcoholics and phylogenetically characterized, and their aerobic ethanol metabolism was studied in vitro to examine their ability to accumulate acetaldehyde beyond the minimum mutagenic concentration (MMC, 50 µM).RESULTS: Bacterial strains that were considered to potentially accumulate acetaldehyde beyond the MMC under aerobic conditions in the colon and rectum were identified and referred to as 'potential acetaldehyde accumulators' (PAAs). Ruminococcus, an obligate anaerobe, was identified as a genus that includes a large number of PAAs. Other obligate anaerobes were also found to include PAAs. The accumulation of acetaldehyde by PAAs colonizing the colorectal mucosal surface could be described, at least in part, as the response of PAAs to oxidative stress.CONCLUSION: Ethanol oxidation by intestinal obligate anaerobes under aerobic conditions in the colon and rectum could also play an important role in the pathogenesis of ethanol-related colorectal cancer.

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