Marathon running alters the DNA base excision repair in human skeletal muscle

Zsolt Radak, Peter Apor, Jozsef Pucsok, Istvan Berkes, Helga Ogonovszky, Gabor Pavlik, Hideko Nakamoto, Sataro Goto

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

80 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species generated either as products of aerobic metabolism or as a consequence of environmental mutagens, oxidatively modify DNA. Formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase (Fpg) and endonuclease III (endo III) or their functional mammalian homologues repair 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG) and damaged pyrimidines, respectively, to curb the deleterious effects of oxidative DNA alterations. A single bout of physical exercise can induce oxidative DNA damage. However, its effect on the activity of repair enzymes is not known. Here we report that the activity of a functional homolog of Fpg, human 8-oxoG DNA glycosylase (hOGG1), is increased significantly, as measured by the excision of 32P labeled damaged oligonucleotide, in human skeletal muscle after a marathon race. The AP site repair enzyme did not change significantly. Despite the large individual differences among the six subjects measured, data suggest that a single-bout of aerobic exercise increases the activity of hOGG1 which is responsible for the excision of 8-oxoG. The up-regulation of DNA repair enzymes might be an important part of the regular exercise induced adaptation process.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1627-1633
Number of pages7
JournalLife Sciences
Volume72
Issue number14
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2003 Feb 21
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

DNA-Formamidopyrimidine Glycosylase
Running
DNA Repair
Muscle
Skeletal Muscle
Repair
Exercise
DNA
DNA Glycosylases
DNA Repair Enzymes
Reactive Nitrogen Species
Curbs
Pyrimidines
Deoxyribonuclease I
Mutagens
Enzymes
Metabolism
Individuality
Oligonucleotides
DNA Damage

Keywords

  • Adaptation
  • Base excision repair
  • DNA damage
  • DNA repair
  • Exercise
  • Oxidative stress

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutics(all)

Cite this

Radak, Z., Apor, P., Pucsok, J., Berkes, I., Ogonovszky, H., Pavlik, G., ... Goto, S. (2003). Marathon running alters the DNA base excision repair in human skeletal muscle. Life Sciences, 72(14), 1627-1633. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0024-3205(02)02476-1

Marathon running alters the DNA base excision repair in human skeletal muscle. / Radak, Zsolt; Apor, Peter; Pucsok, Jozsef; Berkes, Istvan; Ogonovszky, Helga; Pavlik, Gabor; Nakamoto, Hideko; Goto, Sataro.

In: Life Sciences, Vol. 72, No. 14, 21.02.2003, p. 1627-1633.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Radak, Z, Apor, P, Pucsok, J, Berkes, I, Ogonovszky, H, Pavlik, G, Nakamoto, H & Goto, S 2003, 'Marathon running alters the DNA base excision repair in human skeletal muscle', Life Sciences, vol. 72, no. 14, pp. 1627-1633. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0024-3205(02)02476-1
Radak Z, Apor P, Pucsok J, Berkes I, Ogonovszky H, Pavlik G et al. Marathon running alters the DNA base excision repair in human skeletal muscle. Life Sciences. 2003 Feb 21;72(14):1627-1633. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0024-3205(02)02476-1
Radak, Zsolt ; Apor, Peter ; Pucsok, Jozsef ; Berkes, Istvan ; Ogonovszky, Helga ; Pavlik, Gabor ; Nakamoto, Hideko ; Goto, Sataro. / Marathon running alters the DNA base excision repair in human skeletal muscle. In: Life Sciences. 2003 ; Vol. 72, No. 14. pp. 1627-1633.
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