Marked reduction of acyl-CoA synthetase activity and mRNA in intra- abdominal visceral fat by physical exercise

I. Shimomura, K. Tokunaga, K. Kotani, Y. Keno, M. Yanase-Fujiwara, Kazuyuki Kanosue, S. Jiao, T. Funahashi, T. Kobatake, T. Yamamoto, Y. Matsuzawa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

62 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Several reports have suggested that the reduction of intra-abdominal visceral fat after physical exercise is more prominent than that of subcutaneous fat. We compared some parameters in mesenteric and subcutaneous fats between sedentary and exercised rats (treadmill running; 10-20 m/min, 60 min/day, 7 days). Tissue weight and cell volume were decreased in mesenteric fat by the exercise. The exercise reduced activity and mRNA levels of acyl- CoA synthetase (ACS; 67 and 26% of those of the sedentary group, respectively), mRNA levels of lipoprotein lipase (LPL; 49% of those of the sedentary group), and GLUT-4 (38% of those of the sedentary group) in the mesenteric fat. In contrast, all of these parameters did not change significantly in the subcutaneous fat. Gastrocnemius muscle was heavier in exercised rats. ACS activity was elevated in the gastrocnemius muscle of the exercised rats (137% of those of sedentary group), although mRNA levels of ACS, LPL, and GLUT-4 did not change in the muscle by the exercise. These observations suggest that mesenteric fat may contribute to switching of distribution of plasma energy flux, including lipid and glucose, from fat tissue to muscle in physical exercise.

Original languageEnglish
JournalAmerican Journal of Physiology - Endocrinology and Metabolism
Volume265
Issue number1 28-1
Publication statusPublished - 1993
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Coenzyme A Ligases
Intra-Abdominal Fat
Subcutaneous Fat
Fats
Exercise
Messenger RNA
Muscle
Skeletal Muscle
Rats
Muscles
Lipoprotein Lipase
Cell Size
Running
Tissue
Lipids
Weights and Measures
Glucose
Exercise equipment
Fluxes
Plasmas

Keywords

  • gastrocnemius muscle
  • heart
  • subcutaneous fat

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Endocrinology
  • Physiology

Cite this

Marked reduction of acyl-CoA synthetase activity and mRNA in intra- abdominal visceral fat by physical exercise. / Shimomura, I.; Tokunaga, K.; Kotani, K.; Keno, Y.; Yanase-Fujiwara, M.; Kanosue, Kazuyuki; Jiao, S.; Funahashi, T.; Kobatake, T.; Yamamoto, T.; Matsuzawa, Y.

In: American Journal of Physiology - Endocrinology and Metabolism, Vol. 265, No. 1 28-1, 1993.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Shimomura, I, Tokunaga, K, Kotani, K, Keno, Y, Yanase-Fujiwara, M, Kanosue, K, Jiao, S, Funahashi, T, Kobatake, T, Yamamoto, T & Matsuzawa, Y 1993, 'Marked reduction of acyl-CoA synthetase activity and mRNA in intra- abdominal visceral fat by physical exercise', American Journal of Physiology - Endocrinology and Metabolism, vol. 265, no. 1 28-1.
Shimomura, I. ; Tokunaga, K. ; Kotani, K. ; Keno, Y. ; Yanase-Fujiwara, M. ; Kanosue, Kazuyuki ; Jiao, S. ; Funahashi, T. ; Kobatake, T. ; Yamamoto, T. ; Matsuzawa, Y. / Marked reduction of acyl-CoA synthetase activity and mRNA in intra- abdominal visceral fat by physical exercise. In: American Journal of Physiology - Endocrinology and Metabolism. 1993 ; Vol. 265, No. 1 28-1.
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