Mechanism design and air pressure control system improvements of the waseda saxophonist robot

Jorge Solis, Klaus Petersen, Tetsuro Yamamoto, Masaki Takeuchi, Shimpei Ishikawa, Atsuo Takanishi, Kunimatsu Hashimoto, Takeshi Ninomiya

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

    5 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Since 2007, the research on the anthropomorphic saxophonist robot at Waseda University aims in understanding the human motor control from an engineering point of view as well as an approach to enable the interaction with musical partners. As a result of our research, last year we have introduced the Waseda Saxophonist Robot No. 1 (WAS-1), composed of 15-DOFs that reproduced the lips (1-DOF), tonguing (1-DOF), oral cavity, lungs (2-DOF) and fingers (11-DOFs). However, even that the mouth mechanism of WAS-1 was useful in order to adjust the pitch of the saxophone sound, the range of sound pressure was too narrow. Thus, no dynamic effects of the sound can be reproduced (i.e. crescendo and decrescendo). Moreover, the finger mechanism was designed only to play from C3-C#5. On the other hand, a cascade feedback control system has been implemented in the WAS-1; however, a considerable delay in the attack time to reach the desired air pressure was detected. Therefore, in this paper, the Waseda Saxophone Robot No. 2 (WAS-2) which is composed by 22-DOFs is detailed. The lip mechanism of WAS-2 has been designed with 3-DOFs to control the motion of the lower, upper and sideway lips. In addition, a human-like hand (16 DOF-s) has been designed to enable to play all the keys of the instrument. Regarding the improvement of the control system, a feed-forward control system with dead-time compensation has been implemented to assure the accurate control of the air pressure. A set of experiments were carried out to verify the mechanical design improvements and the dynamic response of the air pressure. As a result, the range of sound pressure has been increased and the proposed control system improved the dynamic response of the air pressure control.

    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationProceedings - IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation
    Pages42-47
    Number of pages6
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2010
    Event2010 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation, ICRA 2010 - Anchorage, AK
    Duration: 2010 May 32010 May 7

    Other

    Other2010 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation, ICRA 2010
    CityAnchorage, AK
    Period10/5/310/5/7

    Fingerprint

    Pressure control
    Robots
    Control systems
    Acoustic waves
    Air
    Dynamic response
    Anthropomorphic robots
    Feedforward control
    Feedback control
    Experiments

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Software
    • Artificial Intelligence
    • Control and Systems Engineering
    • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

    Cite this

    Solis, J., Petersen, K., Yamamoto, T., Takeuchi, M., Ishikawa, S., Takanishi, A., ... Ninomiya, T. (2010). Mechanism design and air pressure control system improvements of the waseda saxophonist robot. In Proceedings - IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (pp. 42-47). [5509815] https://doi.org/10.1109/ROBOT.2010.5509815

    Mechanism design and air pressure control system improvements of the waseda saxophonist robot. / Solis, Jorge; Petersen, Klaus; Yamamoto, Tetsuro; Takeuchi, Masaki; Ishikawa, Shimpei; Takanishi, Atsuo; Hashimoto, Kunimatsu; Ninomiya, Takeshi.

    Proceedings - IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation. 2010. p. 42-47 5509815.

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

    Solis, J, Petersen, K, Yamamoto, T, Takeuchi, M, Ishikawa, S, Takanishi, A, Hashimoto, K & Ninomiya, T 2010, Mechanism design and air pressure control system improvements of the waseda saxophonist robot. in Proceedings - IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation., 5509815, pp. 42-47, 2010 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation, ICRA 2010, Anchorage, AK, 10/5/3. https://doi.org/10.1109/ROBOT.2010.5509815
    Solis J, Petersen K, Yamamoto T, Takeuchi M, Ishikawa S, Takanishi A et al. Mechanism design and air pressure control system improvements of the waseda saxophonist robot. In Proceedings - IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation. 2010. p. 42-47. 5509815 https://doi.org/10.1109/ROBOT.2010.5509815
    Solis, Jorge ; Petersen, Klaus ; Yamamoto, Tetsuro ; Takeuchi, Masaki ; Ishikawa, Shimpei ; Takanishi, Atsuo ; Hashimoto, Kunimatsu ; Ninomiya, Takeshi. / Mechanism design and air pressure control system improvements of the waseda saxophonist robot. Proceedings - IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation. 2010. pp. 42-47
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