Mechanism for the posture-specific plasma volume increase after a single intense exercise protocol

Kei Nagashima, Gary W. Mack, Andrew Haskell, Takeshi Nishiyasu, Ethan R. Nadel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

36 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To test the hypothesis that exercise-induced hypervolemia is a posture- dependent process, we measured plasma volume, plasma albumin content, and renal function in seven healthy subjects for 22 h after single upright (Up) or supine (Sup) intense (85% peak oxygen consumption rate) exercise. This posture was maintained for 5 h after exercise. Plasma volume decreased during exercise but returned to control levels by 5 h of recovery in both postures. By 22 h of recovery, plasma volume increased 2.4 ± 0.8 ml/kg in Up but decreased 2.1 ± 0,8 ml/kg in Sup. The plasma volume expansion in Up was accompanied by an increase in plasma albumin content (0.11 ± 0.04 g/kg; P < 0.05). Plasma albumin content was unchanged in Sup. Urine volume and sodium clearance were lower in Up than Sup (P < 0.05) by 5 h of recovery. These data suggest that increased plasma albumin content contributes to the acute phase of exercise-induced hypervolemia. More importantly, the mechanism by which exercise influences the distribution of albumin between extra- and intravascular stores after exercise is altered by posture and is unknown. We speculate that factors associated with postural changes (e.g., central venous pressure) modify the increase in plasma albumin content and the plasma volume expansion after exercise.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)867-873
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Applied Physiology
Volume86
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1999 Mar
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Blood volume
  • Exercise-induced hypervolemia
  • Plasma albumin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Physiology (medical)

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