Mental health of visually and hearing impaired students from the viewpoint of the University Personality Inventory

Tsuguo Yoshida, Tadahiko Ichikawa, Tomoko Ishikawa, Masashi Hori

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Tsukuba College of Technology is the first national university established as an institute of higher education for the visually and hearing impaired. We have been systematically conducting a University Personality Inventory (UPI) survey on our students since 1989 to understand their mental health. In this study, we compared the UPI scores of the new students of Tsukuba College of Technology in 1993 and 1994 with unimpaired students from the University of Tsukuba (control group), but found no significant difference in the UPI scores of the visually impaired and the control group. However, we noticed a significant difference in the average UPI scores between the hearing impaired and the control group. The visuality impaired group were divided into four subgroups, UPI scores descended in order from degree 1 (total blindness), to degrees 2 and 3 (amblyopia), to degree 4 (visual acuity ≤ 0.3). The UPI scores of the degree 4 subgroup were significantly lower than those of the control group. An investigation of the items for which the check rate was at least 50% showed that the visually impaired students had a variety of psychological problems, most of which seemed to concern depression or anxiety as did the normal control group. The number of affirmative responses increased with low visual acuity. The only one belonging to the 'lie' scale item was observed in the group of hearing impaired students. Thus, comparing these three groups from the viewpoint of mental health, we noticed the hearing impaired group was slightly different from the other two groups, but the visually impaired group was similar to the normal control group.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)413-418
Number of pages6
JournalPsychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences
Volume52
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1998 Aug
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Personality Inventory
Hearing
Mental Health
Students
Control Groups
Visual Acuity
Technology
Amblyopia
Blindness
Anxiety
Depression
Psychology
Education

Keywords

  • Hearing impaired
  • Mental health
  • University personality inventory
  • Visually impaired

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neurology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Mental health of visually and hearing impaired students from the viewpoint of the University Personality Inventory. / Yoshida, Tsuguo; Ichikawa, Tadahiko; Ishikawa, Tomoko; Hori, Masashi.

In: Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences, Vol. 52, No. 4, 08.1998, p. 413-418.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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