Microscale Visualization of Erythrocyte Deformation by Colliding with a Rigid Surface Using a High-Speed Impinging Jet

S. Wakasa, Takanobu Yagi, Y. Akimoto, N. Tokunaga, Kiyotaka Iwasaki, Mitsuo Umezu

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Erythrocyte deformation by colliding with a rigid surface using a high-speed impinging jet was studied with microfluidic techniques. We aim to investigate the relevance of colliding erythrocytes with hemolysis. A micro-channel chip was made of polydimenthyl-siloxane (PDMS), which comprised a T- and Y-shaped junction with a micro-nozzle and diffuser in order to attain a high-speed microflow with a jet velocity of m/s scale. A high-speed camera with a microscope imaged colliding erythrocytes by shadow imaging. Porcine erythrocyte with a hematocrit of 0.5 % in phosphate buffer saline was utilized. At the Y-junction, erythrocytes showed buckling due to an impulsive, longitudinal, compressive deformation. Such anomalous phenomena were not detected at the T-junction, where erythrocytes underwent sequential compressions as approaching the colliding surface. Erythrocyte after buckling showed a hazy membrane while being released from the colliding surface, suggesting the ejection of hemoglobin out of the pore on a membrane. Flow-induced hemolysis has been considered as a model of viscous shear stress and exposure time. From our data, however, it was suggested that hemolysis due to a high-speed impinging flow characterized by mechanical heart valve flows may arise as an impulsive failure of erythrocyte membrane upon collision.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationIFMBE Proceedings
Pages1422-1425
Number of pages4
Volume23
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009
Event13th International Conference on Biomedical Engineering, ICBME 2008 -
Duration: 2008 Dec 32008 Dec 6

Other

Other13th International Conference on Biomedical Engineering, ICBME 2008
Period08/12/308/12/6

Fingerprint

Visualization
Membranes
Buckling
Siloxanes
Hemoglobin
High speed cameras
Microfluidics
Shear stress
Nozzles
Buffers
Hemoglobins
Phosphates
Microscopes
Imaging techniques

Keywords

  • erythrocyte
  • heart valve
  • Hemolysis
  • microfluidics
  • turbulence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Bioengineering

Cite this

Microscale Visualization of Erythrocyte Deformation by Colliding with a Rigid Surface Using a High-Speed Impinging Jet. / Wakasa, S.; Yagi, Takanobu; Akimoto, Y.; Tokunaga, N.; Iwasaki, Kiyotaka; Umezu, Mitsuo.

IFMBE Proceedings. Vol. 23 2009. p. 1422-1425.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Wakasa, S, Yagi, T, Akimoto, Y, Tokunaga, N, Iwasaki, K & Umezu, M 2009, Microscale Visualization of Erythrocyte Deformation by Colliding with a Rigid Surface Using a High-Speed Impinging Jet. in IFMBE Proceedings. vol. 23, pp. 1422-1425, 13th International Conference on Biomedical Engineering, ICBME 2008, 08/12/3. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-540-92841-6_351
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