Mismatch between Perceived and Objectively Measured Land Use Mix and Street Connectivity: Associations with Neighborhood Walking

MohammadJavad Koohsari, Hannah Badland, Takemi Sugiyama, Suzanne Mavoa, Hayley Christian, Billie Giles-Corti

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Studies on the mismatch between objective and perceived measures of walkability and walking provide insights into targeting interventions. These studies focused on those living in more walkable environments, but perceiving them as less walkable. However, it is equally important to understand how the other mismatch (living in less walkable areas, but perceiving them as walkable) is related to walking. This study examined how the mismatch between perceived and objective walkability measures (i.e., living in less walkable areas, but perceiving them as walkable, and living in more walkable areas, but perceiving them as less walkable) was associated with walking. Baseline data from adult participants (n = 1466) of the RESIDential Environment Project (Perth, Australia in 2004-06) collected self-report neighborhood walking for recreation and transport in a usual week and participants’ perceptions of street connectivity and land use mix in their neighborhood. The exposure was the mismatch between objective and perceived measures of these. Multilevel logistic regression examined associations of walking with the mismatch between perceived and objective walkability measures. Perceiving high walkable attributes as low walkable was associated with lower levels of walking, while perceiving a low walkable attribute as walkable was associated with higher levels of walking. Walking interventions must create more pedestrian-friendly environments as well as target residents’ perceptions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)242-252
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Urban Health
Volume92
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015 Apr 1
Externally publishedYes

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mismatch
Walking
land use
residential environment
recreation
pedestrian
Recreation
logistics
resident
regression
Self Report
Logistic Models

Keywords

  • Built environment
  • Land use mix
  • Perceptions
  • Street connectivity
  • Urban design
  • Walkability
  • Walking

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Mismatch between Perceived and Objectively Measured Land Use Mix and Street Connectivity : Associations with Neighborhood Walking. / Koohsari, MohammadJavad; Badland, Hannah; Sugiyama, Takemi; Mavoa, Suzanne; Christian, Hayley; Giles-Corti, Billie.

In: Journal of Urban Health, Vol. 92, No. 2, 01.04.2015, p. 242-252.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Koohsari, MohammadJavad ; Badland, Hannah ; Sugiyama, Takemi ; Mavoa, Suzanne ; Christian, Hayley ; Giles-Corti, Billie. / Mismatch between Perceived and Objectively Measured Land Use Mix and Street Connectivity : Associations with Neighborhood Walking. In: Journal of Urban Health. 2015 ; Vol. 92, No. 2. pp. 242-252.
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