Modeling human behavior for virtual training systems

Yohei Murakami, Yuki Sugimoto, Toru Ishida

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

33 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Conslrucling highly realistic agents is essential if agents are to he employed in virtual training systems. In training for collaboration based on face-to-face interaction, the generation of emotional expressions is one key. In training for guidance based on one-to-many interaction such as direction giving for evacuations, emotional expressions must be supplemented by diverse agent behaviors to make the training realistic. To reproduce diverse behavior, we characterize agents by using a various combinations of operation rules instantiated by the user operating the agent. To accomplish this goal, we introduce a user modeling method based on participatory simulations. These simulations enable us to acquire information observed by each user in the simulation and the operating history. Using these data and the domain knowledge including known operation rules, we can generate an explanation for each behavior. Moreover, the application of hypothetical reasoning, which offers consistent selection of hypotheses, to the generation of explanations allows us to use otherwise incompatible operation rules as domain knowledge. In order to validate the proposed modeling method, we apply it to the acquisition of an evacuee's model in a fire-drill experiment. We successfully acquire a subject's model corresponding to the results of an interview with the subject.

Original languageEnglish
Pages127-132
Number of pages6
Publication statusPublished - 2005 Dec 1
Externally publishedYes
Event20th National Conference on Artificial Intelligence and the 17th Innovative Applications of Artificial Intelligence Conference, AAAI-05/IAAI-05 - Pittsburgh, PA, United States
Duration: 2005 Jul 92005 Jul 13

Conference

Conference20th National Conference on Artificial Intelligence and the 17th Innovative Applications of Artificial Intelligence Conference, AAAI-05/IAAI-05
CountryUnited States
CityPittsburgh, PA
Period05/7/905/7/13

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Software
  • Artificial Intelligence

Cite this

Murakami, Y., Sugimoto, Y., & Ishida, T. (2005). Modeling human behavior for virtual training systems. 127-132. Paper presented at 20th National Conference on Artificial Intelligence and the 17th Innovative Applications of Artificial Intelligence Conference, AAAI-05/IAAI-05, Pittsburgh, PA, United States.

Modeling human behavior for virtual training systems. / Murakami, Yohei; Sugimoto, Yuki; Ishida, Toru.

2005. 127-132 Paper presented at 20th National Conference on Artificial Intelligence and the 17th Innovative Applications of Artificial Intelligence Conference, AAAI-05/IAAI-05, Pittsburgh, PA, United States.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Murakami, Y, Sugimoto, Y & Ishida, T 2005, 'Modeling human behavior for virtual training systems' Paper presented at 20th National Conference on Artificial Intelligence and the 17th Innovative Applications of Artificial Intelligence Conference, AAAI-05/IAAI-05, Pittsburgh, PA, United States, 05/7/9 - 05/7/13, pp. 127-132.
Murakami Y, Sugimoto Y, Ishida T. Modeling human behavior for virtual training systems. 2005. Paper presented at 20th National Conference on Artificial Intelligence and the 17th Innovative Applications of Artificial Intelligence Conference, AAAI-05/IAAI-05, Pittsburgh, PA, United States.
Murakami, Yohei ; Sugimoto, Yuki ; Ishida, Toru. / Modeling human behavior for virtual training systems. Paper presented at 20th National Conference on Artificial Intelligence and the 17th Innovative Applications of Artificial Intelligence Conference, AAAI-05/IAAI-05, Pittsburgh, PA, United States.6 p.
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