Modeling pathways to affective barriers on colorectal cancer screening among Japanese Americans

Keiko Honda, Sherri Sheinfeld Gorin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The study aimed to identify the mechanisms through which colorectal cancer (CRC)-specific affective barriers, including fear of finding CRC, embarrassment, and concerns for screening discomfort, can be reduced to guide the development of interventions aimed at the secondary prevention of CRC. A model explaining these affective barriers was developed and tested among a random sample of 305 asymptomatic Japanese Americans using a path analysis. The model suggested that affective barriers could be reduced by increasing CRC-related knowledge, which could be enhanced by acculturation, social support, and physician recommendation. Interventions that focus on increasing CRC-related knowledge could reduce affective barriers to CRC screening for this population when taking the enhancement of communication skills and interpersonal interactions into account.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)115-124
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Behavioral Medicine
Volume28
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2005 Apr
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Asian Americans
Early Detection of Cancer
Colorectal Neoplasms
Acculturation
Secondary Prevention
Social Support
Fear
Communication
Physicians
Population

Keywords

  • Affective barriers to cancer screening
  • Colorectal cancer
  • Japanese Americans
  • Prevention

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

Modeling pathways to affective barriers on colorectal cancer screening among Japanese Americans. / Honda, Keiko; Gorin, Sherri Sheinfeld.

In: Journal of Behavioral Medicine, Vol. 28, No. 2, 04.2005, p. 115-124.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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