Modulation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells Mechanosensing at Fluid Interfaces by Tailored Self-Assembled Protein Monolayers

Xiaofang Jia, Kosuke Minami, Koichiro Uto, Alice Chinghsuan Chang, Jonathan P. Hill, Takeshi Ueki, Jun Nakanishi, Katsuhiko Ariga

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Mechanical cues of cellular microenvironments can modulate cell functions including cell spreading and differentiation. Most studies of cellular functions are performed using a solid substrate, and it is thought that cells cannot spread on fluid substrates because of rapid relaxation, which cannot resist against actomyosin-based cell contractility. Here, the spreading and growth of anchorage-dependent cells such as human mesenchymal stem cells at the liquid interface between a perfluorocarbon fluid and the culture medium are observed. It is demonstrated that a monomolecular protein nanosheet self-assembled at a fluid interface is sufficiently rigid to support cell spreading without additional treatment. Fine tuning of the packing of these proteins at the liquid interface permits tailoring of the mechanics of the protein layer, ultimately allowing for the regulation of cell spreading. The greater stiffness of the protein nanosheets triggers cell spreading, adhesion growth, and yes-associated protein nuclear translocation. Cell behavior at the fluid interface is explained within the framework of the molecular clutch model. In addition, the freestanding ultrathin protein nanosheets are extremely flexible, easily deformed, and perceived by cells as being much softer. The findings are expected to provide a new perspective for insights into cell–material interactions.

Original languageEnglish
Article number1804640
JournalSmall
Volume15
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019 Feb 1
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Stem cells
Mesenchymal Stromal Cells
Monolayers
Modulation
Nanosheets
Proteins
Fluids
Cells
Fluorocarbons
Actomyosin
Clutches
Cell adhesion
Liquids
Substrates
Nuclear Proteins
Culture Media
Cellular Microenvironment
Mechanics
Tuning
Molecular Models

Keywords

  • cell adhesion
  • interfaces
  • monolayers
  • self-assembly
  • stem cells

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biotechnology
  • Biomaterials
  • Chemistry(all)
  • Materials Science(all)

Cite this

Jia, X., Minami, K., Uto, K., Chang, A. C., Hill, J. P., Ueki, T., ... Ariga, K. (2019). Modulation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells Mechanosensing at Fluid Interfaces by Tailored Self-Assembled Protein Monolayers. Small, 15(5), [1804640]. https://doi.org/10.1002/smll.201804640

Modulation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells Mechanosensing at Fluid Interfaces by Tailored Self-Assembled Protein Monolayers. / Jia, Xiaofang; Minami, Kosuke; Uto, Koichiro; Chang, Alice Chinghsuan; Hill, Jonathan P.; Ueki, Takeshi; Nakanishi, Jun; Ariga, Katsuhiko.

In: Small, Vol. 15, No. 5, 1804640, 01.02.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Jia, Xiaofang ; Minami, Kosuke ; Uto, Koichiro ; Chang, Alice Chinghsuan ; Hill, Jonathan P. ; Ueki, Takeshi ; Nakanishi, Jun ; Ariga, Katsuhiko. / Modulation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells Mechanosensing at Fluid Interfaces by Tailored Self-Assembled Protein Monolayers. In: Small. 2019 ; Vol. 15, No. 5.
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