Morphological evolution within spin-cast ultrathin polymer blend films clarified by a freestanding method

Hong Zhang, Shinji Takeoka

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    16 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Polymer phase separation has established a series of bottom-up nanofabrication methods. Owing to the intrinsic immiscibility of most polymer blends, phase separation is typically produced by rapid quenching during spin-casting. However, the full sequence of events that occur during this process is still unclear, especially in the case of ultrathin polymer blend films. Herein, a freestanding method is first introduced to obtain morphological information from the bottom side of the film. We demonstrate that when the thickness of ultrathin film is comparable to the dimensional scale of the phase separation domains, it is feasible to prepare perforated films with uniform nanopores via selective solvent etching. Our results also provide direct evidence that the spinodal decomposition mechanism plays an important role in determining the final morphology within the ultrathin polymer blend films. These findings are of practical value in the fabrication of desired nanostructures by polymer phase separation.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)4315-4321
    Number of pages7
    JournalMacromolecules
    Volume45
    Issue number10
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2012 May 22

    Fingerprint

    Polymer blends
    Phase separation
    Polymers
    Rapid quenching
    Spinodal decomposition
    Nanopores
    Ultrathin films
    Nanotechnology
    Etching
    Nanostructures
    Casting
    Solubility
    Fabrication

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Organic Chemistry
    • Materials Chemistry
    • Polymers and Plastics
    • Inorganic Chemistry

    Cite this

    Morphological evolution within spin-cast ultrathin polymer blend films clarified by a freestanding method. / Zhang, Hong; Takeoka, Shinji.

    In: Macromolecules, Vol. 45, No. 10, 22.05.2012, p. 4315-4321.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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