Motor command detection for a repetitive facilitation exercise assistance system

Satoshi Miura, Junichi Takazawa, Yo Kobayashi, Masakatsu G. Fujie

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

    Abstract

    This paper presents a feasibility study of a brain-machine interface system to assist repetitive facilitation exercise. Repetitive facilitation exercise is an effective rehabilitation method for patients with hemiplegia. In repetitive facilitation exercise, a therapist stimulates the paralyzed part of the patient while motor commands run along the nerve pathway. However, successful repetitive facilitation exercise is difficult to achieve and even a skilled practitioner cannot detect when a motor command occurs in patient's brain. We proposed a brain-machine interface system for automatically detecting motor commands and stimulating the paralyzed part of a patient. To determine motor commands from patient electroencephalogram (EEG) data, we constructed a support vector machine (SVM) system. In this paper, we validated that the discrimination ratio of the motor command by EEG using SVM was higher than the success rate of the repetitive facilitation exercise administered by a therapist. In the experiments, we measured the EEG when the participant bent their elbow when prompted to do so. We analyzed the EEG data using a cross-validation method. We found that the discrimination ratio for each participant was at least 69%, which is above the success rate for repetitive facilitation exercise administered by a therapist. We conclude that the EEG using SVM is useful for detecting motor commands.

    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publication2017 IEEE International Conference on Real-Time Computing and Robotics, RCAR 2017
    PublisherInstitute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.
    Pages267-272
    Number of pages6
    Volume2017-July
    ISBN (Electronic)9781538620342
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2018 Mar 9
    Event2017 IEEE International Conference on Real-Time Computing and Robotics, RCAR 2017 - Okinawa, Japan
    Duration: 2017 Jul 142017 Jul 18

    Other

    Other2017 IEEE International Conference on Real-Time Computing and Robotics, RCAR 2017
    CountryJapan
    CityOkinawa
    Period17/7/1417/7/18

    Fingerprint

    Exercise
    Electroencephalography
    Support vector machines
    Brain
    Support Vector Machine
    Discrimination
    Rehabilitation
    Nerve
    Cross-validation
    Patient rehabilitation
    Pathway
    Electroencephalogram
    Experiment
    Experiments

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Control and Optimization
    • Artificial Intelligence

    Cite this

    Miura, S., Takazawa, J., Kobayashi, Y., & Fujie, M. G. (2018). Motor command detection for a repetitive facilitation exercise assistance system. In 2017 IEEE International Conference on Real-Time Computing and Robotics, RCAR 2017 (Vol. 2017-July, pp. 267-272). Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.. https://doi.org/10.1109/RCAR.2017.8311872

    Motor command detection for a repetitive facilitation exercise assistance system. / Miura, Satoshi; Takazawa, Junichi; Kobayashi, Yo; Fujie, Masakatsu G.

    2017 IEEE International Conference on Real-Time Computing and Robotics, RCAR 2017. Vol. 2017-July Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc., 2018. p. 267-272.

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

    Miura, S, Takazawa, J, Kobayashi, Y & Fujie, MG 2018, Motor command detection for a repetitive facilitation exercise assistance system. in 2017 IEEE International Conference on Real-Time Computing and Robotics, RCAR 2017. vol. 2017-July, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc., pp. 267-272, 2017 IEEE International Conference on Real-Time Computing and Robotics, RCAR 2017, Okinawa, Japan, 17/7/14. https://doi.org/10.1109/RCAR.2017.8311872
    Miura S, Takazawa J, Kobayashi Y, Fujie MG. Motor command detection for a repetitive facilitation exercise assistance system. In 2017 IEEE International Conference on Real-Time Computing and Robotics, RCAR 2017. Vol. 2017-July. Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc. 2018. p. 267-272 https://doi.org/10.1109/RCAR.2017.8311872
    Miura, Satoshi ; Takazawa, Junichi ; Kobayashi, Yo ; Fujie, Masakatsu G. / Motor command detection for a repetitive facilitation exercise assistance system. 2017 IEEE International Conference on Real-Time Computing and Robotics, RCAR 2017. Vol. 2017-July Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc., 2018. pp. 267-272
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