Multiple animal positioning system shows that socially-reared mice influence the social proximity of isolation-reared cagemates

Nozomi Endo, Waka Ujita, Masaya Fujiwara, Hideaki Miyauchi, Hiroyuki Mishima, Yusuke Makino, Lisa Hashimoto, Hiroshi Oyama, Manabu Makinodan, Mayumi Nishi, Chiharu Tohyama, Masaki Kakeyama

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Abstract

Social relationships are a key determinant of social behaviour, and disruption of social behaviour is a major symptom of several psychiatric disorders. However, few studies have analysed social relationships among multiple individuals in a group or how social relationships within a group influence the behaviour of members with impaired socialisation. Here, we developed a video-analysis-based system, the Multiple-Animal Positioning System (MAPS), to automatically and separately analyse the social behaviour of multiple individuals in group housing. Using MAPS, we show that social isolation of male mice during adolescence leads to impaired social proximity in adulthood. The phenotype of these socially isolated mice was partially rescued by cohabitation with group-housed (socially-reared) mice, indicating that both individual behavioural traits and those of cagemates influence social proximity. Furthermore, we demonstrate that low reactive behaviour of other cagemates also influence individual social proximity in male mice.

Original languageEnglish
Article number225
JournalCommunications Biology
Volume1
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018 Dec 1

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Endo, N., Ujita, W., Fujiwara, M., Miyauchi, H., Mishima, H., Makino, Y., Hashimoto, L., Oyama, H., Makinodan, M., Nishi, M., Tohyama, C., & Kakeyama, M. (2018). Multiple animal positioning system shows that socially-reared mice influence the social proximity of isolation-reared cagemates. Communications Biology, 1(1), [225]. https://doi.org/10.1038/s42003-018-0213-5