Neurons in monkey dorsal raphe nucleus code beginning and progress of step-by-step schedule, reward expectation, and amount of reward outcome in the reward schedule task

Kiyonori Inaba, Takashi Mizuhiki, Tsuyoshi Setogawa, Koji Toda, Barry J. Richmond, Munetaka Shidara

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The dorsal raphe nucleus is the major source of serotonin in the brain. It is connected to brain regions related to reward processing, and the neurons show activity related to predicted reward outcome. Clinical observations also suggest that it is important in maintaining alertness and its apparent role in addiction seems to be related to reward processing. Here, we examined whether the neurons in dorsal raphe carry signals about reward outcome and task progress during multitrial schedules. We recorded from 98 single neurons in dorsal raphe of two monkeys. The monkeys perform one, two, or three visual discrimination trials (schedule), obtaining one, two, or three drops of liquid. In the valid cue condition, the length and brightness of a visual cue indicated schedule progress and reward amount, respectively. In the random cue condition, the visual cue was randomly presented with respect to schedule length and reward amount. We found information encoded about (1) schedule onset, (2) reward expectation, (3) reward outcome, and (4) reward amount in the mean firing rates. Information theoretic analysis showed that the temporal variation of the neuronal responses contained additional information related to the progress of the schedule toward the reward rather than only discriminating schedule onset or reward/no reward. When considered in light of all that is known about the raphe in anatomy, physiology, and behavior, the rich encoding about both task progress and predicted reward outcome makes the raphe a strong candidate for providing signals throughout the brain to coordinate persistent goal-seeking behavior.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3477-3491
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Neuroscience
Volume33
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013 Feb 20
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Reward
Haplorhini
Appointments and Schedules
Neurons
Cues
Dorsal Raphe Nucleus
Brain
Serotonin
Anatomy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Neurons in monkey dorsal raphe nucleus code beginning and progress of step-by-step schedule, reward expectation, and amount of reward outcome in the reward schedule task. / Inaba, Kiyonori; Mizuhiki, Takashi; Setogawa, Tsuyoshi; Toda, Koji; Richmond, Barry J.; Shidara, Munetaka.

In: Journal of Neuroscience, Vol. 33, No. 8, 20.02.2013, p. 3477-3491.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Inaba, Kiyonori ; Mizuhiki, Takashi ; Setogawa, Tsuyoshi ; Toda, Koji ; Richmond, Barry J. ; Shidara, Munetaka. / Neurons in monkey dorsal raphe nucleus code beginning and progress of step-by-step schedule, reward expectation, and amount of reward outcome in the reward schedule task. In: Journal of Neuroscience. 2013 ; Vol. 33, No. 8. pp. 3477-3491.
@article{82a6336823e7456293d86328a8b9f308,
title = "Neurons in monkey dorsal raphe nucleus code beginning and progress of step-by-step schedule, reward expectation, and amount of reward outcome in the reward schedule task",
abstract = "The dorsal raphe nucleus is the major source of serotonin in the brain. It is connected to brain regions related to reward processing, and the neurons show activity related to predicted reward outcome. Clinical observations also suggest that it is important in maintaining alertness and its apparent role in addiction seems to be related to reward processing. Here, we examined whether the neurons in dorsal raphe carry signals about reward outcome and task progress during multitrial schedules. We recorded from 98 single neurons in dorsal raphe of two monkeys. The monkeys perform one, two, or three visual discrimination trials (schedule), obtaining one, two, or three drops of liquid. In the valid cue condition, the length and brightness of a visual cue indicated schedule progress and reward amount, respectively. In the random cue condition, the visual cue was randomly presented with respect to schedule length and reward amount. We found information encoded about (1) schedule onset, (2) reward expectation, (3) reward outcome, and (4) reward amount in the mean firing rates. Information theoretic analysis showed that the temporal variation of the neuronal responses contained additional information related to the progress of the schedule toward the reward rather than only discriminating schedule onset or reward/no reward. When considered in light of all that is known about the raphe in anatomy, physiology, and behavior, the rich encoding about both task progress and predicted reward outcome makes the raphe a strong candidate for providing signals throughout the brain to coordinate persistent goal-seeking behavior.",
author = "Kiyonori Inaba and Takashi Mizuhiki and Tsuyoshi Setogawa and Koji Toda and Richmond, {Barry J.} and Munetaka Shidara",
year = "2013",
month = "2",
day = "20",
doi = "10.1523/JNEUROSCI.4388-12.2013",
language = "English",
volume = "33",
pages = "3477--3491",
journal = "Journal of Neuroscience",
issn = "0270-6474",
publisher = "Society for Neuroscience",
number = "8",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Neurons in monkey dorsal raphe nucleus code beginning and progress of step-by-step schedule, reward expectation, and amount of reward outcome in the reward schedule task

AU - Inaba, Kiyonori

AU - Mizuhiki, Takashi

AU - Setogawa, Tsuyoshi

AU - Toda, Koji

AU - Richmond, Barry J.

AU - Shidara, Munetaka

PY - 2013/2/20

Y1 - 2013/2/20

N2 - The dorsal raphe nucleus is the major source of serotonin in the brain. It is connected to brain regions related to reward processing, and the neurons show activity related to predicted reward outcome. Clinical observations also suggest that it is important in maintaining alertness and its apparent role in addiction seems to be related to reward processing. Here, we examined whether the neurons in dorsal raphe carry signals about reward outcome and task progress during multitrial schedules. We recorded from 98 single neurons in dorsal raphe of two monkeys. The monkeys perform one, two, or three visual discrimination trials (schedule), obtaining one, two, or three drops of liquid. In the valid cue condition, the length and brightness of a visual cue indicated schedule progress and reward amount, respectively. In the random cue condition, the visual cue was randomly presented with respect to schedule length and reward amount. We found information encoded about (1) schedule onset, (2) reward expectation, (3) reward outcome, and (4) reward amount in the mean firing rates. Information theoretic analysis showed that the temporal variation of the neuronal responses contained additional information related to the progress of the schedule toward the reward rather than only discriminating schedule onset or reward/no reward. When considered in light of all that is known about the raphe in anatomy, physiology, and behavior, the rich encoding about both task progress and predicted reward outcome makes the raphe a strong candidate for providing signals throughout the brain to coordinate persistent goal-seeking behavior.

AB - The dorsal raphe nucleus is the major source of serotonin in the brain. It is connected to brain regions related to reward processing, and the neurons show activity related to predicted reward outcome. Clinical observations also suggest that it is important in maintaining alertness and its apparent role in addiction seems to be related to reward processing. Here, we examined whether the neurons in dorsal raphe carry signals about reward outcome and task progress during multitrial schedules. We recorded from 98 single neurons in dorsal raphe of two monkeys. The monkeys perform one, two, or three visual discrimination trials (schedule), obtaining one, two, or three drops of liquid. In the valid cue condition, the length and brightness of a visual cue indicated schedule progress and reward amount, respectively. In the random cue condition, the visual cue was randomly presented with respect to schedule length and reward amount. We found information encoded about (1) schedule onset, (2) reward expectation, (3) reward outcome, and (4) reward amount in the mean firing rates. Information theoretic analysis showed that the temporal variation of the neuronal responses contained additional information related to the progress of the schedule toward the reward rather than only discriminating schedule onset or reward/no reward. When considered in light of all that is known about the raphe in anatomy, physiology, and behavior, the rich encoding about both task progress and predicted reward outcome makes the raphe a strong candidate for providing signals throughout the brain to coordinate persistent goal-seeking behavior.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84874218076&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84874218076&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.4388-12.2013

DO - 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.4388-12.2013

M3 - Article

C2 - 23426675

AN - SCOPUS:84874218076

VL - 33

SP - 3477

EP - 3491

JO - Journal of Neuroscience

JF - Journal of Neuroscience

SN - 0270-6474

IS - 8

ER -