New Aspects of Magnesium Function: A Key Regulator in Nucleosome Self-Assembly, Chromatin Folding and Phase Separation

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Metal cations are associated with many biological processes. The effects of these cations on nucleic acids and chromatin were extensively studied in the early stages of nucleic acid and chromatin research. The results revealed that some monovalent and divalent metal cations, including Mg2+, profoundly affect the conformations and stabilities of nucleic acids, the folding of chromatin fibers, and the extent of chromosome condensation. Apart from these effects, there have only been a few reports on the functions of these cations. In 2007 and 2013, however, Mg2+-implicated novel phenomena were found: Mg2+ facilitates or enables both self-assembly of identical double-stranded (ds) DNA molecules and self-assembly of identical nucleosomes in vitro. These phenomena may be deeply implicated in the heterochromatin domain formation and chromatin-based phase separation. Furthermore, a recent study showed that elevation of the intranuclear Mg2+ concentration causes unusual differentiation of mouse ES (embryonic stem) cells. All of these phenomena seem to be closely related to one another. Mg2+ seems to be a key regulator of chromatin dynamics and chromatin-based biological processes.

Original languageEnglish
JournalInternational journal of molecular sciences
Volume20
Issue number17
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019 Aug 29

Fingerprint

chromatin
Chromatin Assembly and Disassembly
Nucleosomes
regulators
Phase separation
Self assembly
folding
Magnesium
Chromatin
magnesium
self assembly
Nucleic acids
Positive ions
Cations
nucleic acids
Nucleic Acids
Biological Phenomena
cations
Chromosomes
Stem cells

Keywords

  • chromatin
  • DNA self-assembly
  • ES cell
  • Mg2+
  • nucleosome self-assembly
  • phase separation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Catalysis
  • Molecular Biology
  • Spectroscopy
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry
  • Organic Chemistry
  • Inorganic Chemistry

Cite this

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title = "New Aspects of Magnesium Function: A Key Regulator in Nucleosome Self-Assembly, Chromatin Folding and Phase Separation",
abstract = "Metal cations are associated with many biological processes. The effects of these cations on nucleic acids and chromatin were extensively studied in the early stages of nucleic acid and chromatin research. The results revealed that some monovalent and divalent metal cations, including Mg2+, profoundly affect the conformations and stabilities of nucleic acids, the folding of chromatin fibers, and the extent of chromosome condensation. Apart from these effects, there have only been a few reports on the functions of these cations. In 2007 and 2013, however, Mg2+-implicated novel phenomena were found: Mg2+ facilitates or enables both self-assembly of identical double-stranded (ds) DNA molecules and self-assembly of identical nucleosomes in vitro. These phenomena may be deeply implicated in the heterochromatin domain formation and chromatin-based phase separation. Furthermore, a recent study showed that elevation of the intranuclear Mg2+ concentration causes unusual differentiation of mouse ES (embryonic stem) cells. All of these phenomena seem to be closely related to one another. Mg2+ seems to be a key regulator of chromatin dynamics and chromatin-based biological processes.",
keywords = "chromatin, DNA self-assembly, ES cell, Mg2+, nucleosome self-assembly, phase separation",
author = "Takashi Ohyama",
year = "2019",
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language = "English",
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journal = "International Journal of Molecular Sciences",
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T1 - New Aspects of Magnesium Function

T2 - A Key Regulator in Nucleosome Self-Assembly, Chromatin Folding and Phase Separation

AU - Ohyama, Takashi

PY - 2019/8/29

Y1 - 2019/8/29

N2 - Metal cations are associated with many biological processes. The effects of these cations on nucleic acids and chromatin were extensively studied in the early stages of nucleic acid and chromatin research. The results revealed that some monovalent and divalent metal cations, including Mg2+, profoundly affect the conformations and stabilities of nucleic acids, the folding of chromatin fibers, and the extent of chromosome condensation. Apart from these effects, there have only been a few reports on the functions of these cations. In 2007 and 2013, however, Mg2+-implicated novel phenomena were found: Mg2+ facilitates or enables both self-assembly of identical double-stranded (ds) DNA molecules and self-assembly of identical nucleosomes in vitro. These phenomena may be deeply implicated in the heterochromatin domain formation and chromatin-based phase separation. Furthermore, a recent study showed that elevation of the intranuclear Mg2+ concentration causes unusual differentiation of mouse ES (embryonic stem) cells. All of these phenomena seem to be closely related to one another. Mg2+ seems to be a key regulator of chromatin dynamics and chromatin-based biological processes.

AB - Metal cations are associated with many biological processes. The effects of these cations on nucleic acids and chromatin were extensively studied in the early stages of nucleic acid and chromatin research. The results revealed that some monovalent and divalent metal cations, including Mg2+, profoundly affect the conformations and stabilities of nucleic acids, the folding of chromatin fibers, and the extent of chromosome condensation. Apart from these effects, there have only been a few reports on the functions of these cations. In 2007 and 2013, however, Mg2+-implicated novel phenomena were found: Mg2+ facilitates or enables both self-assembly of identical double-stranded (ds) DNA molecules and self-assembly of identical nucleosomes in vitro. These phenomena may be deeply implicated in the heterochromatin domain formation and chromatin-based phase separation. Furthermore, a recent study showed that elevation of the intranuclear Mg2+ concentration causes unusual differentiation of mouse ES (embryonic stem) cells. All of these phenomena seem to be closely related to one another. Mg2+ seems to be a key regulator of chromatin dynamics and chromatin-based biological processes.

KW - chromatin

KW - DNA self-assembly

KW - ES cell

KW - Mg2+

KW - nucleosome self-assembly

KW - phase separation

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