Non-invasive primate head restraint using thermoplastic masks

Caroline B. Drucker, Monica L. Carlson, Koji Toda, Nicholas K. DeWind, Michael L. Platt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The success of many neuroscientific studies depends upon adequate head fixation of awake, behaving animals. Typically, this is achieved by surgically affixing a head-restraint prosthesis to the skull. New method: Here we report the use of thermoplastic masks to non-invasively restrain monkeys' heads. Mesh thermoplastic sheets become pliable when heated and can then be molded to an individual monkey's head. After cooling, the custom mask retains this shape indefinitely for day-to-day use. Results: We successfully trained rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) to perform cognitive tasks while wearing thermoplastic masks. Using these masks, we achieved a level of head stability sufficient for high-resolution eye-tracking and intracranial electrophysiology. Comparison with existing method: Compared with traditional head-posts, we find that thermoplastic masks perform at least as well during infrared eye-tracking and single-neuron recordings, allow for clearer magnetic resonance image acquisition, enable freer placement of a transcranial magnetic stimulation coil, and impose lower financial and time costs on the lab. Conclusions: We conclude that thermoplastic masks are a viable non-invasive form of primate head restraint that enable a wide range of neuroscientific experiments.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)90-100
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Neuroscience Methods
Volume253
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015 Sep 1
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Masks
Primates
Head
Macaca mulatta
Haplorhini
Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation
Electrophysiology
Skull
Prostheses and Implants
Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy
Neurons
Costs and Cost Analysis

Keywords

  • Electrophysiology
  • Eye-tracking
  • Head restraint
  • Head-post
  • Non-human primates
  • Transcranial magnetic stimulation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Drucker, C. B., Carlson, M. L., Toda, K., DeWind, N. K., & Platt, M. L. (2015). Non-invasive primate head restraint using thermoplastic masks. Journal of Neuroscience Methods, 253, 90-100. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jneumeth.2015.06.013

Non-invasive primate head restraint using thermoplastic masks. / Drucker, Caroline B.; Carlson, Monica L.; Toda, Koji; DeWind, Nicholas K.; Platt, Michael L.

In: Journal of Neuroscience Methods, Vol. 253, 01.09.2015, p. 90-100.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Drucker, CB, Carlson, ML, Toda, K, DeWind, NK & Platt, ML 2015, 'Non-invasive primate head restraint using thermoplastic masks', Journal of Neuroscience Methods, vol. 253, pp. 90-100. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jneumeth.2015.06.013
Drucker, Caroline B. ; Carlson, Monica L. ; Toda, Koji ; DeWind, Nicholas K. ; Platt, Michael L. / Non-invasive primate head restraint using thermoplastic masks. In: Journal of Neuroscience Methods. 2015 ; Vol. 253. pp. 90-100.
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