Non-persistent effect of prior experience on change blindness: Investigation on naive observers

Kohske Takahashi, Katsumi Watanabe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The effects of prior experience often persist despite their futility. For example, vision scientists who have a long experience of a particular change blindness display are compelled to look at the location of the expected change even when they know that a change will not occur at the same location (Takahashi & Watanabe, 2008). Here, we investigated the types of experience that are required to form the persistent bias. Naive observers performed a typical change blindness task. Before the task, they repeatedly experienced the detection of a change in an identical display. The prior experience produced a gaze bias toward the experienced target. However, the bias decreased after the observers became aware that a change would not occur at the same location. These results suggest that prior experience immediately modulates visual search; however, repetitive detection was not sufficient for producing the persistent bias as observed in the case of vision scientists.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)115-125
Number of pages11
JournalPsychologia
Volume51
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2008 Jun
Externally publishedYes

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Keywords

  • Change blindness
  • Eye movement
  • Prior experience
  • Visual search

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Non-persistent effect of prior experience on change blindness : Investigation on naive observers. / Takahashi, Kohske; Watanabe, Katsumi.

In: Psychologia, Vol. 51, No. 2, 06.2008, p. 115-125.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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