Northern Sky Galactic Cosmic Ray Anisotropy between 10 and 1000 TeV with the Tibet Air Shower Array

M. Amenomori, X. J. Bi, D. Chen, T. L. Chen, W. Y. Chen, S. W. Cui, Danzengluobu, L. K. Ding, C. F. Feng, Zhaoyang Feng, Z. Y. Feng, Q. B. Gou, Y. Q. Guo, H. H. He, Z. T. He, K. Hibino, N. Hotta, Haibing Hu, H. B. Hu, J. HuangH. Y. Jia, L. Jiang, F. Kajino, K. Kasahara, Y. Katayose, C. Kato, K. Kawata, M. Kozai, Labaciren, G. M. Le, A. F. Li, H. J. Li, W. J. Li, C. Liu, J. S. Liu, M. Y. Liu, H. Lu, X. R. Meng, T. Miyazaki, K. Mizutani, K. Munakata, T. Nakajima, Y. Nakamura, H. Nanjo, M. Nishizawa, T. Niwa, M. Ohnishi, I. Ohta, Shunsuke Ozawa, X. L. Qian, X. B. Qu, T. Saito, T. Y. Saito, M. Sakata, T. K. Sako, J. Shao, M. Shibata, A. Shiomi, T. Shirai, H. Sugimoto, M. Takita, Y. H. Tan, N. Tateyama, Shoji Torii, H. Tsuchiya, S. Udo, H. Wang, H. R. Wu, L. Xue, Y. Yamamoto, K. Yamauchi, Z. Yang, A. F. Yuan, T. Yuda, L. M. Zhai, H. M. Zhang, J. L. Zhang, X. Y. Zhang, Y. Zhang, Yi Zhang, Ying Zhang, Zhaxisangzhu, X. X. Zhou

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31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We report on the analysis of the 10-1000 TeV large-scale sidereal anisotropy of Galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) with the data collected by the Tibet Air Shower Array from 1995 October to 2010 February. In this analysis, we improve the energy estimate and extend the decl. range down to -30°. We find that the anisotropy maps above 100 TeV are distinct from that at a multi-TeV band. The so-called tail-in and loss-cone features identified at low energies get less significant, and a new component appears at ∼100 TeV. The spatial distribution of the GCR intensity with an excess (7.2σ pre-trial, 5.2σ post-trial) and a deficit (-5.8σ pre-trial) are observed in the 300 TeV anisotropy map, in close agreement with IceCube's results at 400 TeV. Combining the Tibet results in the northern sky with IceCube's results in the southern sky, we establish a full-sky picture of the anisotropy in hundreds of TeV band. We further find that the amplitude of the first order anisotropy increases sharply above ∼100 TeV, indicating a new component of the anisotropy. All these results may shed new light on understanding the origin and propagation of GCRs.

Original languageEnglish
Article number153
JournalAstrophysical Journal
Volume836
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017 Feb 20

Keywords

  • astroparticle physics
  • cosmic rays

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Astronomy and Astrophysics
  • Space and Planetary Science

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    Amenomori, M., Bi, X. J., Chen, D., Chen, T. L., Chen, W. Y., Cui, S. W., Danzengluobu, Ding, L. K., Feng, C. F., Feng, Z., Feng, Z. Y., Gou, Q. B., Guo, Y. Q., He, H. H., He, Z. T., Hibino, K., Hotta, N., Hu, H., Hu, H. B., ... Zhou, X. X. (2017). Northern Sky Galactic Cosmic Ray Anisotropy between 10 and 1000 TeV with the Tibet Air Shower Array. Astrophysical Journal, 836(2), [153]. https://doi.org/10.3847/1538-4357/836/2/153