Numerical analyses of the electromagnetic force acting on high-temperature superconducting power cables due to fault current

X. Wang, A. Ishiyama, M. Ohya, O. Maruyama, T. Ohkuma

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

In Japan, the development of the 66kV class REB 2C 3O 7x (RE123; RE stands for rare earth) high-temperature superconducting (HTS) power cable was begun in 2008 as a national project. 66kV class RE123 HTS power cables may be subjected to a fault current of 31.5kA rms for 2s. Therefore, the electromagnetic and thermal characteristics of HTS power cables have to be determined under fault conditions to ensure stability and feasibility. In this study, numerical analyses were performed using a computer program on the basis of the finite element method and an equivalent circuit model to evaluate the electromagnetic and thermal behaviors of a 66kV class HTS model cable resulting from the fault current. The electromagnetic forces acting on coated conductors that are assembled in the HTS model cable were also numerically simulated under the fault condition. The result found was that the maximum electromagnetic force acting on the coated conductor in the peeling and compression direction was less than 20kPa. However, the irreversible I c degradations caused by the peeling and compression stress were above several MPa in previous studies. Thus, the results of this study indicate a low probability of I c degradation of the 66kV class HTS power cable being caused by the electromagnetic force due to the fault current.

Original languageEnglish
Article number054018
JournalSuperconductor Science and Technology
Volume25
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012 May 1

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ceramics and Composites
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Metals and Alloys
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering
  • Materials Chemistry

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