Object-based anisotropies in the flash-lag effect

Katsumi Watanabe, Kenji Yokoi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The relative visual position of a briefly flashed stimulus is systematically modified in the presence of motion signals. We investigated the two-dimensional distortion of the positional representation of a flash relative to a moving stimulus. Analysis of the spatial pattern of mislocalization revealed that the perceived position of a flash was not uniformly displaced, but instead shifted toward a single point of convergence that followed the moving object from behind at a fixed distance. Although the absolute magnitude of mislocalization increased with motion speed, the convergence point remained unaffected. The motion modified the perceived position of a flash, but had little influence on the perceived shape of a spatially extended flash stimulus. These results demonstrate that motion anisotropically distorts positional representation after the shapes of objects are represented. Furthermore, the results imply that the flash-lag effect may be considered a special case of two-dimensional anisotropic distortion.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)728-735
Number of pages8
JournalPsychological Science
Volume17
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2006 Aug
Externally publishedYes

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Anisotropy
Spatial Analysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Object-based anisotropies in the flash-lag effect. / Watanabe, Katsumi; Yokoi, Kenji.

In: Psychological Science, Vol. 17, No. 8, 08.2006, p. 728-735.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Watanabe, Katsumi ; Yokoi, Kenji. / Object-based anisotropies in the flash-lag effect. In: Psychological Science. 2006 ; Vol. 17, No. 8. pp. 728-735.
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