One size does not fit all

Applying the right game concepts for the right persons to encourage non-game activities

Hina Akasaki, Shoko Suzuki, Kanako Nakajima, Koko Yamabe, Mizuki Sakamoto, Todorka Alexandrova, Tatsuo Nakajima

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

    4 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    In this paper, we present some insights extracted from experiences with conducting three case studies that show how different game-based approaches affect people’s motivation to encourage more activities in digital services. The first case study is a game-based English words learning application. The second case study is a gamified sharing economy service. The third case study is a persuasive service customized for a user’s unique preference. The results of the case studies show that adopting only one approach is not effective to motivate all diverse people, and multiple approaches should be incorporated when developing digital services that motivate diverse users by game-based approaches.

    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationHuman Interface and the Management of Information: Applications and Services - 18th International Conference, HCI International 2016, Proceedings
    PublisherSpringer Verlag
    Pages103-114
    Number of pages12
    Volume9735
    ISBN (Print)9783319403960
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2016
    Event18th International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction, HCI International 2016 - Toronto, Canada
    Duration: 2016 Jul 172016 Jul 22

    Publication series

    NameLecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)
    Volume9735
    ISSN (Print)03029743
    ISSN (Electronic)16113349

    Other

    Other18th International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction, HCI International 2016
    CountryCanada
    CityToronto
    Period16/7/1716/7/22

    Fingerprint

    Person
    Game
    Sharing
    Concepts

    Keywords

    • Gamification
    • Healthcare
    • Human motivation
    • Learning
    • Personality
    • Preference
    • Sharing economy

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Computer Science(all)
    • Theoretical Computer Science

    Cite this

    Akasaki, H., Suzuki, S., Nakajima, K., Yamabe, K., Sakamoto, M., Alexandrova, T., & Nakajima, T. (2016). One size does not fit all: Applying the right game concepts for the right persons to encourage non-game activities. In Human Interface and the Management of Information: Applications and Services - 18th International Conference, HCI International 2016, Proceedings (Vol. 9735, pp. 103-114). (Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics); Vol. 9735). Springer Verlag. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-40397-7_11

    One size does not fit all : Applying the right game concepts for the right persons to encourage non-game activities. / Akasaki, Hina; Suzuki, Shoko; Nakajima, Kanako; Yamabe, Koko; Sakamoto, Mizuki; Alexandrova, Todorka; Nakajima, Tatsuo.

    Human Interface and the Management of Information: Applications and Services - 18th International Conference, HCI International 2016, Proceedings. Vol. 9735 Springer Verlag, 2016. p. 103-114 (Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics); Vol. 9735).

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

    Akasaki, H, Suzuki, S, Nakajima, K, Yamabe, K, Sakamoto, M, Alexandrova, T & Nakajima, T 2016, One size does not fit all: Applying the right game concepts for the right persons to encourage non-game activities. in Human Interface and the Management of Information: Applications and Services - 18th International Conference, HCI International 2016, Proceedings. vol. 9735, Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics), vol. 9735, Springer Verlag, pp. 103-114, 18th International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction, HCI International 2016, Toronto, Canada, 16/7/17. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-40397-7_11
    Akasaki H, Suzuki S, Nakajima K, Yamabe K, Sakamoto M, Alexandrova T et al. One size does not fit all: Applying the right game concepts for the right persons to encourage non-game activities. In Human Interface and the Management of Information: Applications and Services - 18th International Conference, HCI International 2016, Proceedings. Vol. 9735. Springer Verlag. 2016. p. 103-114. (Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-40397-7_11
    Akasaki, Hina ; Suzuki, Shoko ; Nakajima, Kanako ; Yamabe, Koko ; Sakamoto, Mizuki ; Alexandrova, Todorka ; Nakajima, Tatsuo. / One size does not fit all : Applying the right game concepts for the right persons to encourage non-game activities. Human Interface and the Management of Information: Applications and Services - 18th International Conference, HCI International 2016, Proceedings. Vol. 9735 Springer Verlag, 2016. pp. 103-114 (Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)).
    @inproceedings{1c1694553c2f40d593bb932f95c4823e,
    title = "One size does not fit all: Applying the right game concepts for the right persons to encourage non-game activities",
    abstract = "In this paper, we present some insights extracted from experiences with conducting three case studies that show how different game-based approaches affect people’s motivation to encourage more activities in digital services. The first case study is a game-based English words learning application. The second case study is a gamified sharing economy service. The third case study is a persuasive service customized for a user’s unique preference. The results of the case studies show that adopting only one approach is not effective to motivate all diverse people, and multiple approaches should be incorporated when developing digital services that motivate diverse users by game-based approaches.",
    keywords = "Gamification, Healthcare, Human motivation, Learning, Personality, Preference, Sharing economy",
    author = "Hina Akasaki and Shoko Suzuki and Kanako Nakajima and Koko Yamabe and Mizuki Sakamoto and Todorka Alexandrova and Tatsuo Nakajima",
    year = "2016",
    doi = "10.1007/978-3-319-40397-7_11",
    language = "English",
    isbn = "9783319403960",
    volume = "9735",
    series = "Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)",
    publisher = "Springer Verlag",
    pages = "103--114",
    booktitle = "Human Interface and the Management of Information: Applications and Services - 18th International Conference, HCI International 2016, Proceedings",
    address = "Germany",

    }

    TY - GEN

    T1 - One size does not fit all

    T2 - Applying the right game concepts for the right persons to encourage non-game activities

    AU - Akasaki, Hina

    AU - Suzuki, Shoko

    AU - Nakajima, Kanako

    AU - Yamabe, Koko

    AU - Sakamoto, Mizuki

    AU - Alexandrova, Todorka

    AU - Nakajima, Tatsuo

    PY - 2016

    Y1 - 2016

    N2 - In this paper, we present some insights extracted from experiences with conducting three case studies that show how different game-based approaches affect people’s motivation to encourage more activities in digital services. The first case study is a game-based English words learning application. The second case study is a gamified sharing economy service. The third case study is a persuasive service customized for a user’s unique preference. The results of the case studies show that adopting only one approach is not effective to motivate all diverse people, and multiple approaches should be incorporated when developing digital services that motivate diverse users by game-based approaches.

    AB - In this paper, we present some insights extracted from experiences with conducting three case studies that show how different game-based approaches affect people’s motivation to encourage more activities in digital services. The first case study is a game-based English words learning application. The second case study is a gamified sharing economy service. The third case study is a persuasive service customized for a user’s unique preference. The results of the case studies show that adopting only one approach is not effective to motivate all diverse people, and multiple approaches should be incorporated when developing digital services that motivate diverse users by game-based approaches.

    KW - Gamification

    KW - Healthcare

    KW - Human motivation

    KW - Learning

    KW - Personality

    KW - Preference

    KW - Sharing economy

    UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84978915501&partnerID=8YFLogxK

    UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84978915501&partnerID=8YFLogxK

    U2 - 10.1007/978-3-319-40397-7_11

    DO - 10.1007/978-3-319-40397-7_11

    M3 - Conference contribution

    SN - 9783319403960

    VL - 9735

    T3 - Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)

    SP - 103

    EP - 114

    BT - Human Interface and the Management of Information: Applications and Services - 18th International Conference, HCI International 2016, Proceedings

    PB - Springer Verlag

    ER -