Optic nerve input-dependent regulation of neural stem cell proliferation in the optic tectum of adult zebrafish

Yuki Sato, Hiroaki Yano, Yuki Shimizu, Hideomi Tanaka, Toshio Ohshima

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    Abstract

    Adult neurogenesis attracts broad attention as a possible cure for neurological disorders. However, its regulatory mechanism is still unclear. Therefore, they have been studying the cell proliferation mechanisms of neural stem cells (NSCs) using zebrafish, which have high regenerative potential in the adult brain. The presence of neuroepithelial-type NSCs in the optic tectum of adult zebrafish has been previously reported. In the present study, it was first confirmed that NSCs in the optic tectum decrease or increase in proportion to projection of the optic nerves from the retina. At 4 days after optic nerve crush (ONC), BrdU-positive cells decreased in the optic tectum's operation side. In contrast, at 3 weeks after ONC, BrdU-positive cells increased in the optic tectum's operation side. To study the regulatory mechanisms, they focused on the BDNF/TrkB system as a regulatory factor in the ONC model. It was found that bdnf was mainly expressed in the periventricular gray zone (PGZ) of the optic tectum by using in situ hybridization. Interestingly, expression level of bdnf significantly decreased in the optic tectum at 4 days after ONC, and its expression level tended to increase at 3 weeks after ONC. They conducted rescue experiments using a TrkB agonist and confirmed that decrease of NSC proliferation in the optic tectum by ONC was rescued by TrkB signal activation, suggesting stimuli-dependent regulation of NSC proliferation in the optic tectum of adult zebrafish.

    Original languageEnglish
    JournalDevelopmental Neurobiology
    DOIs
    Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2016

    Keywords

    • BDNF
    • Stem cell
    • TrkB
    • Zebrafish

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience
    • Developmental Neuroscience

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