Optimal deployment of fuel cells in distribution systems by using genetic algorithms

Y. Zoka, H. Sasaki, J. Kubokawa, R. Yokoyama, H. Tanaka

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

    16 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    A fuel cell has been expected to be a very energy efficient and clean device and has been technologically matured to a stage of practical use. In consideration of its relatively small generation capacity, a fuel cell may be installed in a distribution network. This paper presents the framework of a method of introducing fuel cells into a radial distribution system. According to this framework, an optimal deployment problem of fuel cells is formulated as a combinatorial optimization problem. Since this problem has nonlinear objective function to be minimized, the optimal solution could be obtains only through an exhaustive search, which is susceptible to combinatorial explosion for large scale systems. Hence, a genetic algorithm (GA) must be an adequate method to obtain a solution within reasonable computation time. Further, several kinds of techniques to improve GA performance have been introduced in this paper. The proposed algorithm has been applied to test distribution systems of 69 and 111 nodes with successful results.

    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationProceedings of the IEEE Conference on Evolutionary Computation
    Place of PublicationPiscataway, NJ, United States
    PublisherIEEE
    Pages479-484
    Number of pages6
    Volume1
    Publication statusPublished - 1995
    EventProceedings of the 1995 IEEE International Conference on Evolutionary Computation. Part 1 (of 2) - Perth, Aust
    Duration: 1995 Nov 291995 Dec 1

    Other

    OtherProceedings of the 1995 IEEE International Conference on Evolutionary Computation. Part 1 (of 2)
    CityPerth, Aust
    Period95/11/2995/12/1

    Fingerprint

    Fuel cells
    Genetic algorithms
    Combinatorial optimization
    Electric power distribution
    Explosions
    Large scale systems

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Engineering(all)

    Cite this

    Zoka, Y., Sasaki, H., Kubokawa, J., Yokoyama, R., & Tanaka, H. (1995). Optimal deployment of fuel cells in distribution systems by using genetic algorithms. In Proceedings of the IEEE Conference on Evolutionary Computation (Vol. 1, pp. 479-484). Piscataway, NJ, United States: IEEE.

    Optimal deployment of fuel cells in distribution systems by using genetic algorithms. / Zoka, Y.; Sasaki, H.; Kubokawa, J.; Yokoyama, R.; Tanaka, H.

    Proceedings of the IEEE Conference on Evolutionary Computation. Vol. 1 Piscataway, NJ, United States : IEEE, 1995. p. 479-484.

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

    Zoka, Y, Sasaki, H, Kubokawa, J, Yokoyama, R & Tanaka, H 1995, Optimal deployment of fuel cells in distribution systems by using genetic algorithms. in Proceedings of the IEEE Conference on Evolutionary Computation. vol. 1, IEEE, Piscataway, NJ, United States, pp. 479-484, Proceedings of the 1995 IEEE International Conference on Evolutionary Computation. Part 1 (of 2), Perth, Aust, 95/11/29.
    Zoka Y, Sasaki H, Kubokawa J, Yokoyama R, Tanaka H. Optimal deployment of fuel cells in distribution systems by using genetic algorithms. In Proceedings of the IEEE Conference on Evolutionary Computation. Vol. 1. Piscataway, NJ, United States: IEEE. 1995. p. 479-484
    Zoka, Y. ; Sasaki, H. ; Kubokawa, J. ; Yokoyama, R. ; Tanaka, H. / Optimal deployment of fuel cells in distribution systems by using genetic algorithms. Proceedings of the IEEE Conference on Evolutionary Computation. Vol. 1 Piscataway, NJ, United States : IEEE, 1995. pp. 479-484
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