Oxidation mechanism and overall removal rates of endocrine disrupting chemicals by aquatic plants

A. R. Reis, K. Tabei, yutaka Sakakibara

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    19 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate experimentally and theoretically the oxidation mechanisms and overall removal rates of phenolic endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) by aquatic plants. EDCs used in this study were bisphenol-A (BPA), 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP), 4-tert-octylphenol (4-t-OP), and pentachlorophenol (PCP). Referring to reported detection levels in aquatic environments and contaminated sites, the feed concentration of each EDC was set from 1 to 100. μg/L. Experimental results showed that, except for PCP, phenolic EDCs were stably and concurrently removed by different types of aquatic plants over 70 days in long-term continuous treatments. Primal enzymes responsible for oxidation of BPA, 2,4-DCP, and 4-t-OP were peroxidases (POs). Moreover, enzymatic removal rates of BPA, 2,4-DCP, and 4-t-OP by POs were more than 2 orders of magnitude larger than those by aquatic plants. Assuming that overall removal rates of EDCs are controlled by mass transfer rates onto liquid films on the surface of aquatic plants, an electrochemical method based on the limiting current theory was developed to measure the mass transfer rates of EDCs. Because of extremely large removal rates of EDCs by POs, observed removal rates by aquatic plants were in reasonably good agreement with calculated results by a mathematical model developed based on an assumption that mass transfer limitation is a rate-limiting step.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)79-88
    Number of pages10
    JournalJournal of Hazardous Materials
    Volume265
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2014 Jan 30

    Fingerprint

    Endocrine Disruptors
    aquatic plant
    oxidation
    Oxidation
    Peroxidases
    Pentachlorophenol
    Mass transfer
    mass transfer
    PCP
    electrochemical method
    Liquid films
    rate
    chemical
    removal
    aquatic environment
    Theoretical Models
    Enzymes
    Mathematical models
    enzyme
    liquid

    Keywords

    • Biological Fenton reaction
    • Endocrine disrupting chemicals
    • Hydrogen peroxide
    • Peroxidase
    • Phytoremediation

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis
    • Pollution
    • Waste Management and Disposal
    • Environmental Chemistry
    • Environmental Engineering

    Cite this

    Oxidation mechanism and overall removal rates of endocrine disrupting chemicals by aquatic plants. / Reis, A. R.; Tabei, K.; Sakakibara, yutaka.

    In: Journal of Hazardous Materials, Vol. 265, 30.01.2014, p. 79-88.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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