PB-2, a polysaccharide fraction from lichen Flavoparmelia baltimorensis, peripherally promotes the induction of long-term potentiation in the rat dentate gyrus in vivo

Eiko Hirano, Hiroshi Saito, Yoshihisa Ito, Kumiko Ishige, Yoshikuni Edagawa, Noriko Shimizu, Tadahiro Takeda, Takao Narui, Shoji Shibara, Kazuho Abe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We have previously found that oral or intravenous administration of PC-2, a polysaccharide fraction purified from extracts of lichen Flavoparmelia caperata, facilitates the induction of long-term potentiation (LTP) in the dentate gyrus of anesthetized rats. PC-2 could be useful in the development of therapeutic drugs for senile dementia. However, it has been very difficult to obtain the material Flavoparmelia caperata because of its scarcity. In the present study, we therefore investigated whether PB-2, a polysaccharide fraction from another lichen Flavoparmelia baltimorensis, has similar biological effects. Oral administration of PB-2 (100-200 mg/kg) did not affect basal evoked potentials, but significantly promoted the induction of LTP following tetanic stimulation (30 pulses at 60 Hz) in the dentate gyrus of anesthetized rats. Intravenous injection of PB-2 (1-5 mg/kg) was also effective in promoting the induction of LTP, but intracerebroventricular injection of PB-2 (1-2 mg/brain) was ineffective. PB-2, as well as PC-2, should be valuable in identifying factors that promote synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)307-311
Number of pages5
JournalBrain Research
Volume963
Issue number1-2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2003 Feb 14
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Flavoparmelia baltimorensis
  • Hippocampus
  • Lichen
  • Long-term potentiation
  • α-Glucan

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Molecular Biology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Developmental Biology

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