Perception of voiceless fricatives by Japanese listeners of advanced and intermediate level English proficiency

Hinako Masuda, Takayuki Arai

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Numerous research has investigated how first language influences the perception of foreign sounds. The present study focuses on the perception of voiceless English fricatives by Japanese listeners with advanced and intermediate level English proficiency, and compares their results with that of English native listeners. Listeners identified consonants embedded in /a - a/ in quiet, multi-speaker babble and white noise (SNR=0 dB). Results revealed that intermediate level learners scored the lowest among all listener groups, and /th/-/s/ confusions were unique to Japanese listeners. Confusions of /th/-/f/ were observed among all listener groups, which suggest that those phoneme confusions may be universal.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 11th Annual Conference of the International Speech Communication Association, INTERSPEECH 2010
Pages1866-1869
Number of pages4
Publication statusPublished - 2010
Externally publishedYes
Event11th Annual Conference of the International Speech Communication Association: Spoken Language Processing for All, INTERSPEECH 2010 - Makuhari, Chiba
Duration: 2010 Sep 262010 Sep 30

Other

Other11th Annual Conference of the International Speech Communication Association: Spoken Language Processing for All, INTERSPEECH 2010
CityMakuhari, Chiba
Period10/9/2610/9/30

Keywords

  • English consonants
  • English proficiency
  • Japanese
  • Non-native
  • Speech perception

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Language and Linguistics
  • Speech and Hearing

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  • Cite this

    Masuda, H., & Arai, T. (2010). Perception of voiceless fricatives by Japanese listeners of advanced and intermediate level English proficiency. In Proceedings of the 11th Annual Conference of the International Speech Communication Association, INTERSPEECH 2010 (pp. 1866-1869)