Performance analysis of desiccant dehumidification systems driven by low-grade heat source

Jongsoo Jeong, Seiichi Yamaguchi, Kiyoshi Saito, Sunao Kawai

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    34 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    If a desiccant dehumidification system can be driven by a heat source whose temperature is below 50 °C, exhaust heat from devices such as fuel cells or air conditioners can be used as its heat source, thereby saving energy. Therefore, in this study, we used a previously validated simulation model to determine the minimum heat source temperature for driving a desiccant dehumidification system. We considered four desiccant dehumidification systems that can be driven by waste heat - conventional desiccant-type systems (wheel type and batch type with only desiccant), a system with a precooler, double-stage-type systems (a type with two desiccant wheels and a four-partition desiccant wheel type), and a batch-type system with an internal heat exchanger. We found that among these systems, the last system can be driven by the lowest heated air temperature - approximately 33 °C - which is considerably lower than that of the conventional system.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)928-945
    Number of pages18
    JournalInternational Journal of Refrigeration
    Volume34
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2011 Jun

    Fingerprint

    Wheels
    Waste heat
    Air
    Temperature
    Heat exchangers
    Fuel cells
    Energy conservation
    Hot Temperature

    Keywords

    • Air conditioning
    • Dehumidification
    • Desiccant
    • Desiccant wheel
    • Optimization
    • Silica gel

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Mechanical Engineering
    • Building and Construction

    Cite this

    Performance analysis of desiccant dehumidification systems driven by low-grade heat source. / Jeong, Jongsoo; Yamaguchi, Seiichi; Saito, Kiyoshi; Kawai, Sunao.

    In: International Journal of Refrigeration, Vol. 34, No. 4, 06.2011, p. 928-945.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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