Phagocytic response to fully controlled plural stimulation of antigens on macrophage using on-chip microcultivation system

Kazunori Matsumura, Kazuki Orita, Yuichi Wakamoto, Kenji Yasuda

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To understand the control mechanism of innate immune response in macrophages, a series of phagocytic responses to plural stimulation of antigens on identical cells was observed. Two zymosan particles, which were used as antigens, were put on different surfaces of a macrophage using optical tweezers in an on-chip single-cell cultivation system, which maintains isolated conditions of each macrophage during their cultivation. When the two zymosan particles were attached to the macrophage simultaneously, the macrophage responded and phagocytosed both of the antigens simultaneously. In contrast, when the second antigen was attached to the surface after the first phagocytosis had started, the macrophage did not respond to the second stimulation during the first phagocytosis; the second phagocytosis started only after the first process had finished. These results indicate that (i) phagocytosis in a macrophage is not an independent process when there are plural stimulations; (ii) the response of the macrophage to the second stimulation is related to the time" delay from the first stimulation. Stimulations that occur at short time intervals resulted in simultaneous phagocytosis, while a second stimulation that is delayed long enough might be neglected until the completion of the first phagocytic process.

Original languageEnglish
Article number7
JournalJournal of Nanobiotechnology
Volume4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2006 Aug 16
Externally publishedYes

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Macrophages
Antigens
Phagocytosis
Zymosan
Optical Tweezers
Optical tweezers
System-on-chip
Innate Immunity
Time delay

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Biotechnology

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Phagocytic response to fully controlled plural stimulation of antigens on macrophage using on-chip microcultivation system. / Matsumura, Kazunori; Orita, Kazuki; Wakamoto, Yuichi; Yasuda, Kenji.

In: Journal of Nanobiotechnology, Vol. 4, 7, 16.08.2006.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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