Physical Activity Protects the Pathological Alterations of Alzheimer’s Disease Kidneys via the Activation of PACAP and BMP Signaling Pathways

Helga Perényi, Vince Szegeczki, Gabriella Horváth, Barbara Hinnah, Andrea Tamás, Zsolt Radák, Dóra Ábrahám, Róza Zákány, Dora Reglodi, Tamás Juhász*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder with typical amyloid beta (Aβ) aggregations. Elimination of the Aβ precursors via the kidneys makes the organ a potential factor in the systemic degeneration leading to AD. Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) exerts neuroprotective effects in AD and plays a protective role in kidney pathologies. Increased physical activity is preventive of the formation of AD, but its detailed mechanism and possible connections with PACAP have not been clarified. In the kidneys of AD mice, the effects of physical activity were investigated by comparing wild-type and AD organs. Aβ plaque formation was reduced in AD kidneys after increased training (TAD). Mechanotransduction elevated PACAP receptor expression in TAD mice and normalized the protein kinase A (PKA)-mediated pathways. BMP4/BMPR1 elevation activated Smad1 expression and normalized collagen type IV in TAD animals. In conclusion, our data suggest that elevated physical activity can prevent the AD-induced pathological changes in the kidneys via, at least in part, the activation of PACAP–BMP signaling crosstalk.

Original languageEnglish
Article number243
JournalFrontiers in Cellular Neuroscience
Volume14
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2020 Aug 14
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Alzheimer’s disease
  • BMP signaling
  • PACAP
  • collagen type IV
  • physical activity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

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