Prevention of depression in first-year university students with high harm avoidance Evaluation of the effects of group cognitive behavioral therapy at 1-year follow-up

Tatsuo Saigo, Masaki Hayashida, Jun Tayama, Sayaka Ogawa, Peter Bernick, Atsushi Takeoka, Susumu Shirabe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

High harm avoidance (HA) scores on the temperament and character inventory appear to be a risk factor for depressive disorders and suicide. Since 2012, we have conducted group cognitive behavioral therapy (G-CBT) interventions for students at Nagasaki University with high HA and without depressive disorders, with the aim of preventing depression. Here, we report on the effects of the G-CBT at 1-year follow-up for the 2012 to 2015 period. Forty-two participants with high HA were included in the final analysis. Outcomes were measured with the Beck Depression Inventory II, Manifest Anxiety Scale, 28-item General Health Questionnaire, and Brief Core Schema Scales at baseline, and at 6-month, and 1-year follow-ups. Repeated-measures analyses of variance revealed a significant decrease in mean depressive symptom scores at the 6-month follow-up point; this decrease was maintained at 1 year. Improvements in cognitive schemas were also seen at 6 months and 1 year. We observed improvements in cognitive schemas associated with depression as a result of the G-CBT intervention, with effects maintained at 1 year post-intervention. This intervention may be effective in positively modifying the cognitions of students with HA and preventing future depression.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere13009
JournalMedicine (United States)
Volume97
Issue number44
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018 Nov 1
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Character inventory
  • Depression
  • Group cognitive behavioral therapy
  • Harm avoidance
  • High-risk approach
  • Temperament

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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