Psycho-physiological effects of visual artifacts by stereoscopic display systems

Sanghyun Kim, Junki Yoshitake, Hiroyuki Morikawa, Takashi Kawai, Osamu Yamada, Akihiko Iguchi

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

    3 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    The methods available for delivering stereoscopic (3D) display using glasses can be classified as time-multiplexing and spatial-multiplexing. With both methods, intrinsic visual artifacts result from the generation of the 3D image pair on a flat panel display device. In the case of the time-multiplexing method, an observer perceives three artifacts: flicker, the Mach-Dvorak effect, and a phantom array. These only occur under certain conditions, with flicker appearing in any conditions, the Mach-Dvorak effect during smooth pursuit eye movements (SPM), and a phantom array during saccadic eye movements (saccade). With spatial-multiplexing, the artifacts are temporal-parallax (due to the interlaced video signal), binocular rivalry, and reduced spatial resolution. These artifacts are considered one of the major impediments to the safety and comfort of 3D display users. In this study, the implications of the artifacts for the safety and comfort are evaluated by examining the psychological changes they cause through subjective symptoms of fatigue and the depth sensation. Physiological changes are also measured as objective responses based on analysis of heart and brain activation by visual artifacts. Further, to understand the characteristics of each artifact and the combined effects of the artifacts, four experimental conditions are developed and tested. The results show that perception of artifacts differs according to the visual environment and the display method. Furthermore visual fatigue and the depth sensation are influenced by the individual characteristics of each artifact. Similarly, heart rate variability and regional cerebral oxygenation changes by perception of artifacts in conditions.

    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationProceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering
    Volume7863
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2011
    EventStereoscopic Displays and Applications XXII - San Francisco, CA
    Duration: 2011 Jan 242011 Jan 27

    Other

    OtherStereoscopic Displays and Applications XXII
    CitySan Francisco, CA
    Period11/1/2411/1/27

    Fingerprint

    physiological effects
    Stereoscopic Display
    display devices
    Multiplexing
    artifacts
    Display devices
    Spatial multiplexing
    3D Display
    Eye Movements
    Eye movements
    Phantom
    Fatigue
    Mach number
    Safety
    multiplexing
    Fatigue of materials
    Flat Panel Display
    Heart Rate Variability
    Flat panel displays
    Binoculars

    Keywords

    • 3D artifacts
    • 3D display
    • Binocular rivalry
    • Mach-Dvorak effect
    • Phantom array
    • Pseudo parallax
    • Spatial-multiplexing
    • Time-multiplexing

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Applied Mathematics
    • Computer Science Applications
    • Electrical and Electronic Engineering
    • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
    • Condensed Matter Physics

    Cite this

    Kim, S., Yoshitake, J., Morikawa, H., Kawai, T., Yamada, O., & Iguchi, A. (2011). Psycho-physiological effects of visual artifacts by stereoscopic display systems. In Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering (Vol. 7863). [78631Q] https://doi.org/10.1117/12.872373

    Psycho-physiological effects of visual artifacts by stereoscopic display systems. / Kim, Sanghyun; Yoshitake, Junki; Morikawa, Hiroyuki; Kawai, Takashi; Yamada, Osamu; Iguchi, Akihiko.

    Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. Vol. 7863 2011. 78631Q.

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

    Kim, S, Yoshitake, J, Morikawa, H, Kawai, T, Yamada, O & Iguchi, A 2011, Psycho-physiological effects of visual artifacts by stereoscopic display systems. in Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. vol. 7863, 78631Q, Stereoscopic Displays and Applications XXII, San Francisco, CA, 11/1/24. https://doi.org/10.1117/12.872373
    Kim S, Yoshitake J, Morikawa H, Kawai T, Yamada O, Iguchi A. Psycho-physiological effects of visual artifacts by stereoscopic display systems. In Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. Vol. 7863. 2011. 78631Q https://doi.org/10.1117/12.872373
    Kim, Sanghyun ; Yoshitake, Junki ; Morikawa, Hiroyuki ; Kawai, Takashi ; Yamada, Osamu ; Iguchi, Akihiko. / Psycho-physiological effects of visual artifacts by stereoscopic display systems. Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. Vol. 7863 2011.
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