Regular exercise results in systemic adaptation against oxidative stress

Zsolt Radak, Nikolett Hart, Orsolya Marton, Erika Koltai

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Exercise is associated with increased metabolic demand, which results in an increased formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). However, regular exercise appears to decrease the incidence of a wide range of ROS-associated diseases, especially those related to lifestyle, such as cardiovascular diseases and type II diabetes, and also age related conditions such as Alzheimer's diseases and some kind of cancers. The preventive effect of regular exercise, at least in part, is due to oxidative stress-induced adaptation. The oxidative challenge-related adaptive process of exercise is probably not just dependent upon the levels of ROS but primarily on the increase in antioxidant and housekeeping enzyme activities related to oxidative damage repair enzymes. Therefore, the effects of exercise resemble the characteristics of hormesis. In addition, it appears that oxidative challenge-related effects of exercise are systemic. Skeletal muscle, liver, and brain have different metabolic rates and functions during exercise, but the adaptive response is very similar: increased antioxidant/damage repair enzyme activity, lower oxidative damage, and increased resistance to oxidative stress, due to changes in redox homeostasis. Hence, it is likely that the beneficial effects of exercise are due to the ability of exercise to produce increased levels of ROS. A sedentary life, which systemically decreases the body's capability to withstand oxidative challenge, increases the vulnerability to numerous physiological and environmental perturbations.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationSystems Biology of Free Radicals and Antioxidants
PublisherSpringer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg
Pages3855-3869
Number of pages15
ISBN (Electronic)9783642300189
ISBN (Print)3642300170, 9783642300172
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012 May 1
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Reactive Oxygen Species
Oxidative Stress
Enzymes
Antioxidants
Hormesis
Housekeeping
Aptitude
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Oxidation-Reduction
Life Style
Alzheimer Disease
Skeletal Muscle
Homeostasis
Cardiovascular Diseases
Liver
Incidence
Brain
Neoplasms

Keywords

  • Adaptation
  • Exercise
  • Hormesis
  • Oxidative damage
  • Reactive oxygen species
  • Redox signaling
  • Repair

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Radak, Z., Hart, N., Marton, O., & Koltai, E. (2012). Regular exercise results in systemic adaptation against oxidative stress. In Systems Biology of Free Radicals and Antioxidants (pp. 3855-3869). Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-30018-9_166

Regular exercise results in systemic adaptation against oxidative stress. / Radak, Zsolt; Hart, Nikolett; Marton, Orsolya; Koltai, Erika.

Systems Biology of Free Radicals and Antioxidants. Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg, 2012. p. 3855-3869.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Radak, Z, Hart, N, Marton, O & Koltai, E 2012, Regular exercise results in systemic adaptation against oxidative stress. in Systems Biology of Free Radicals and Antioxidants. Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg, pp. 3855-3869. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-30018-9_166
Radak Z, Hart N, Marton O, Koltai E. Regular exercise results in systemic adaptation against oxidative stress. In Systems Biology of Free Radicals and Antioxidants. Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg. 2012. p. 3855-3869 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-30018-9_166
Radak, Zsolt ; Hart, Nikolett ; Marton, Orsolya ; Koltai, Erika. / Regular exercise results in systemic adaptation against oxidative stress. Systems Biology of Free Radicals and Antioxidants. Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg, 2012. pp. 3855-3869
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