Relationship between subtypes of irritable bowel syndrome and severity of symptoms associated with panic disorder

Nagisa Sugaya, Hisanobu Kaiya, Hiroaki Kumano, Shinobu Nomura

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    17 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Objective. To investigate the relationship between subtypes of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and severity of symptoms associated with panic disorder (PD). Material and methods. The study comprised 178 consecutive new PD outpatients. Sixty-four patients met the Rome-II criteria for IBS (IBS[+]; 29 diarrhea-predominant IBS (IBSD), 14 constipation-predominant IBS (IBSC), 21 other types of IBS). Results. IBSD patients with agoraphobia avoided a greater number of scenes owing to fear of panic attack than did PD patients without IBS (IBS) and with agoraphobia. IBS[+] patients with avoidant behavior due to fear of IBS symptoms had significantly higher Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) scores and avoided a larger number of scenes owing to fear of panic attack than IBS[+] patients with agoraphobia and without avoidant behavior due to fear of IBS symptoms or IBS patients with agoraphobia. Conclusions. The results suggest that the presence of IBSD or avoidant behavior because of fear of IBS symptoms may be associated with a more severe form of agoraphobia, and the latter may also be associated with depression.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)675-681
    Number of pages7
    JournalScandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology
    Volume43
    Issue number6
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2008

    Fingerprint

    Irritable Bowel Syndrome
    Panic Disorder
    Agoraphobia
    Fear
    Depression
    Constipation
    Diarrhea

    Keywords

    • Agoraphobia
    • Anticipatory anxiety
    • Depression
    • Diarrhea and constipation
    • Irritable bowel syndrome
    • Panic disorder

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Gastroenterology

    Cite this

    Relationship between subtypes of irritable bowel syndrome and severity of symptoms associated with panic disorder. / Sugaya, Nagisa; Kaiya, Hisanobu; Kumano, Hiroaki; Nomura, Shinobu.

    In: Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, Vol. 43, No. 6, 2008, p. 675-681.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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