Representation of agents

a study of phenomena in virtual environments

William Joseph King, Jun Ohya

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

There is an increasing need for a robust emotion state model in human computer interaction, especially when naturalistic input, such as facial expression, is used. Existing cognitive models of emotion provide a starting point, but they are dependent upon phenomena which occur in the physical environment. Virtual environments present the human with qualitatively different phenomena. We investigated subjective, multi-dimensional responses and objective, facial responses to a set of 20 different phenomena or stimuli. This set of stimuli included caricatures and anthropomorphic forms typically used to represent agents in human interfaces. The stimuli were presented both static and dynamic forms. Subjects rated the anthropomorphic forms as having a higher degree of agency and intelligence. A variety of other interesting results were found relating to complexity, anthropomorphism, movement, and culture of the subject. These findings indicate that a substantially different emotion state model will have to be developed for human computer interaction. The findings provide practical heuristics for the design of 'social' or agent-based interfaces.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationRobot and Human Communication - Proceedings of the IEEE International Workshop
Pages199-204
Number of pages6
Publication statusPublished - 1995
Externally publishedYes
EventProceedings of the 1995 4th IEEE International Workshop on Robot and Human Communication, RO-MAN - Tokyo, Jpn
Duration: 1995 Jul 51995 Jul 7

Other

OtherProceedings of the 1995 4th IEEE International Workshop on Robot and Human Communication, RO-MAN
CityTokyo, Jpn
Period95/7/595/7/7

Fingerprint

Human computer interaction
Virtual reality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hardware and Architecture
  • Software

Cite this

King, W. J., & Ohya, J. (1995). Representation of agents: a study of phenomena in virtual environments. In Robot and Human Communication - Proceedings of the IEEE International Workshop (pp. 199-204)

Representation of agents : a study of phenomena in virtual environments. / King, William Joseph; Ohya, Jun.

Robot and Human Communication - Proceedings of the IEEE International Workshop. 1995. p. 199-204.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

King, WJ & Ohya, J 1995, Representation of agents: a study of phenomena in virtual environments. in Robot and Human Communication - Proceedings of the IEEE International Workshop. pp. 199-204, Proceedings of the 1995 4th IEEE International Workshop on Robot and Human Communication, RO-MAN, Tokyo, Jpn, 95/7/5.
King WJ, Ohya J. Representation of agents: a study of phenomena in virtual environments. In Robot and Human Communication - Proceedings of the IEEE International Workshop. 1995. p. 199-204
King, William Joseph ; Ohya, Jun. / Representation of agents : a study of phenomena in virtual environments. Robot and Human Communication - Proceedings of the IEEE International Workshop. 1995. pp. 199-204
@inproceedings{f3e207e141174a1ea61cc0b1c521aa9d,
title = "Representation of agents: a study of phenomena in virtual environments",
abstract = "There is an increasing need for a robust emotion state model in human computer interaction, especially when naturalistic input, such as facial expression, is used. Existing cognitive models of emotion provide a starting point, but they are dependent upon phenomena which occur in the physical environment. Virtual environments present the human with qualitatively different phenomena. We investigated subjective, multi-dimensional responses and objective, facial responses to a set of 20 different phenomena or stimuli. This set of stimuli included caricatures and anthropomorphic forms typically used to represent agents in human interfaces. The stimuli were presented both static and dynamic forms. Subjects rated the anthropomorphic forms as having a higher degree of agency and intelligence. A variety of other interesting results were found relating to complexity, anthropomorphism, movement, and culture of the subject. These findings indicate that a substantially different emotion state model will have to be developed for human computer interaction. The findings provide practical heuristics for the design of 'social' or agent-based interfaces.",
author = "King, {William Joseph} and Jun Ohya",
year = "1995",
language = "English",
pages = "199--204",
booktitle = "Robot and Human Communication - Proceedings of the IEEE International Workshop",

}

TY - GEN

T1 - Representation of agents

T2 - a study of phenomena in virtual environments

AU - King, William Joseph

AU - Ohya, Jun

PY - 1995

Y1 - 1995

N2 - There is an increasing need for a robust emotion state model in human computer interaction, especially when naturalistic input, such as facial expression, is used. Existing cognitive models of emotion provide a starting point, but they are dependent upon phenomena which occur in the physical environment. Virtual environments present the human with qualitatively different phenomena. We investigated subjective, multi-dimensional responses and objective, facial responses to a set of 20 different phenomena or stimuli. This set of stimuli included caricatures and anthropomorphic forms typically used to represent agents in human interfaces. The stimuli were presented both static and dynamic forms. Subjects rated the anthropomorphic forms as having a higher degree of agency and intelligence. A variety of other interesting results were found relating to complexity, anthropomorphism, movement, and culture of the subject. These findings indicate that a substantially different emotion state model will have to be developed for human computer interaction. The findings provide practical heuristics for the design of 'social' or agent-based interfaces.

AB - There is an increasing need for a robust emotion state model in human computer interaction, especially when naturalistic input, such as facial expression, is used. Existing cognitive models of emotion provide a starting point, but they are dependent upon phenomena which occur in the physical environment. Virtual environments present the human with qualitatively different phenomena. We investigated subjective, multi-dimensional responses and objective, facial responses to a set of 20 different phenomena or stimuli. This set of stimuli included caricatures and anthropomorphic forms typically used to represent agents in human interfaces. The stimuli were presented both static and dynamic forms. Subjects rated the anthropomorphic forms as having a higher degree of agency and intelligence. A variety of other interesting results were found relating to complexity, anthropomorphism, movement, and culture of the subject. These findings indicate that a substantially different emotion state model will have to be developed for human computer interaction. The findings provide practical heuristics for the design of 'social' or agent-based interfaces.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0029471199&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0029471199&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Conference contribution

SP - 199

EP - 204

BT - Robot and Human Communication - Proceedings of the IEEE International Workshop

ER -