Resident and facility characteristics associated with care-need level deterioration in long-term care welfare facilities in Japan

Xueying Jin, Nanako Tamiya, Boyoung Jeon, Akira Kawamura, Hideto Takahashi, Haruko Noguchi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Aim: To determine the resident and facility characteristics associated with residents’ care-need level deterioration in long-term care welfare facilities in Japan. Methods: A nationally representative sample of 358 886 residents who lived in 3774 long-term care welfare facilities for at least 1 year from October 2012 was obtained from long-term care insurance claims data. Facility characteristics were linked with a survey of institutions and establishments for long-term care in 2012. We used a multilevel logistic regression according to the inclusion and exclusion of lost to follow-up to define the resident and facility characteristics associated with resident care-need level deteriorations (lost to follow-up: the majority were hospitalized residents or had died; were treated as deterioration in the including loss to follow-up model). Results: Adjusting for the covariates, at the resident level, older age and lower care-need level at baseline were more likely to show deterioration in the care-need level. At the facility level, metropolitan facilities, unit model (all private room settings) and mixed-model facilities (partly private room settings) were less likely to experience care-need level deterioration. A higher proportion of registered nurses among all nurses was negatively related to care-need level deterioration only in the model including lost to follow-up. A higher proportion of registered dietitians among all dietitians and the facilities in business for fewer years were negatively associated with care-need level deterioration only in the model excluding lost to follow-up. Conclusions: The present study could help identify residents who are at risk of care-need level deterioration, and could contribute to improvements in provider quality performance and enhance competence in the market. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2018; 18: 758–766.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)758-766
Number of pages9
JournalGeriatrics and Gerontology International
Volume18
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018 May 1

Fingerprint

welfare care
Lost to Follow-Up
Long-Term Care
Japan
resident
Patients' Rooms
Nutritionists
Long-Term Care Insurance
Nurses
Mental Competency
Logistic Models
nurse
insurance claim
long-term care insurance
exclusion
logistics
inclusion

Keywords

  • care-needs
  • functional decline
  • multilevel analysis
  • nursing homes
  • quality of care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Gerontology
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

Cite this

Resident and facility characteristics associated with care-need level deterioration in long-term care welfare facilities in Japan. / Jin, Xueying; Tamiya, Nanako; Jeon, Boyoung; Kawamura, Akira; Takahashi, Hideto; Noguchi, Haruko.

In: Geriatrics and Gerontology International, Vol. 18, No. 5, 01.05.2018, p. 758-766.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Jin, Xueying ; Tamiya, Nanako ; Jeon, Boyoung ; Kawamura, Akira ; Takahashi, Hideto ; Noguchi, Haruko. / Resident and facility characteristics associated with care-need level deterioration in long-term care welfare facilities in Japan. In: Geriatrics and Gerontology International. 2018 ; Vol. 18, No. 5. pp. 758-766.
@article{343261ebba1041aabb35b03cc12c2c8f,
title = "Resident and facility characteristics associated with care-need level deterioration in long-term care welfare facilities in Japan",
abstract = "Aim: To determine the resident and facility characteristics associated with residents’ care-need level deterioration in long-term care welfare facilities in Japan. Methods: A nationally representative sample of 358 886 residents who lived in 3774 long-term care welfare facilities for at least 1 year from October 2012 was obtained from long-term care insurance claims data. Facility characteristics were linked with a survey of institutions and establishments for long-term care in 2012. We used a multilevel logistic regression according to the inclusion and exclusion of lost to follow-up to define the resident and facility characteristics associated with resident care-need level deteriorations (lost to follow-up: the majority were hospitalized residents or had died; were treated as deterioration in the including loss to follow-up model). Results: Adjusting for the covariates, at the resident level, older age and lower care-need level at baseline were more likely to show deterioration in the care-need level. At the facility level, metropolitan facilities, unit model (all private room settings) and mixed-model facilities (partly private room settings) were less likely to experience care-need level deterioration. A higher proportion of registered nurses among all nurses was negatively related to care-need level deterioration only in the model including lost to follow-up. A higher proportion of registered dietitians among all dietitians and the facilities in business for fewer years were negatively associated with care-need level deterioration only in the model excluding lost to follow-up. Conclusions: The present study could help identify residents who are at risk of care-need level deterioration, and could contribute to improvements in provider quality performance and enhance competence in the market. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2018; 18: 758–766.",
keywords = "care-needs, functional decline, multilevel analysis, nursing homes, quality of care",
author = "Xueying Jin and Nanako Tamiya and Boyoung Jeon and Akira Kawamura and Hideto Takahashi and Haruko Noguchi",
year = "2018",
month = "5",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1111/ggi.13248",
language = "English",
volume = "18",
pages = "758--766",
journal = "Geriatrics and Gerontology International",
issn = "1447-0594",
publisher = "Japan Geriatrics Society",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Resident and facility characteristics associated with care-need level deterioration in long-term care welfare facilities in Japan

AU - Jin, Xueying

AU - Tamiya, Nanako

AU - Jeon, Boyoung

AU - Kawamura, Akira

AU - Takahashi, Hideto

AU - Noguchi, Haruko

PY - 2018/5/1

Y1 - 2018/5/1

N2 - Aim: To determine the resident and facility characteristics associated with residents’ care-need level deterioration in long-term care welfare facilities in Japan. Methods: A nationally representative sample of 358 886 residents who lived in 3774 long-term care welfare facilities for at least 1 year from October 2012 was obtained from long-term care insurance claims data. Facility characteristics were linked with a survey of institutions and establishments for long-term care in 2012. We used a multilevel logistic regression according to the inclusion and exclusion of lost to follow-up to define the resident and facility characteristics associated with resident care-need level deteriorations (lost to follow-up: the majority were hospitalized residents or had died; were treated as deterioration in the including loss to follow-up model). Results: Adjusting for the covariates, at the resident level, older age and lower care-need level at baseline were more likely to show deterioration in the care-need level. At the facility level, metropolitan facilities, unit model (all private room settings) and mixed-model facilities (partly private room settings) were less likely to experience care-need level deterioration. A higher proportion of registered nurses among all nurses was negatively related to care-need level deterioration only in the model including lost to follow-up. A higher proportion of registered dietitians among all dietitians and the facilities in business for fewer years were negatively associated with care-need level deterioration only in the model excluding lost to follow-up. Conclusions: The present study could help identify residents who are at risk of care-need level deterioration, and could contribute to improvements in provider quality performance and enhance competence in the market. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2018; 18: 758–766.

AB - Aim: To determine the resident and facility characteristics associated with residents’ care-need level deterioration in long-term care welfare facilities in Japan. Methods: A nationally representative sample of 358 886 residents who lived in 3774 long-term care welfare facilities for at least 1 year from October 2012 was obtained from long-term care insurance claims data. Facility characteristics were linked with a survey of institutions and establishments for long-term care in 2012. We used a multilevel logistic regression according to the inclusion and exclusion of lost to follow-up to define the resident and facility characteristics associated with resident care-need level deteriorations (lost to follow-up: the majority were hospitalized residents or had died; were treated as deterioration in the including loss to follow-up model). Results: Adjusting for the covariates, at the resident level, older age and lower care-need level at baseline were more likely to show deterioration in the care-need level. At the facility level, metropolitan facilities, unit model (all private room settings) and mixed-model facilities (partly private room settings) were less likely to experience care-need level deterioration. A higher proportion of registered nurses among all nurses was negatively related to care-need level deterioration only in the model including lost to follow-up. A higher proportion of registered dietitians among all dietitians and the facilities in business for fewer years were negatively associated with care-need level deterioration only in the model excluding lost to follow-up. Conclusions: The present study could help identify residents who are at risk of care-need level deterioration, and could contribute to improvements in provider quality performance and enhance competence in the market. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2018; 18: 758–766.

KW - care-needs

KW - functional decline

KW - multilevel analysis

KW - nursing homes

KW - quality of care

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85046350962&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85046350962&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/ggi.13248

DO - 10.1111/ggi.13248

M3 - Article

C2 - 29356311

AN - SCOPUS:85046350962

VL - 18

SP - 758

EP - 766

JO - Geriatrics and Gerontology International

JF - Geriatrics and Gerontology International

SN - 1447-0594

IS - 5

ER -