Responding to Failure

The Responsibility to Protect after Libya

Christopher Edward Hobson

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    3 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    During its first decade in existence, the Responsibility to Protect (R2P) doctrine has struggled to transcend the complexities that plague humanitarian action. This article examines the political challenges that shape the practice of R2P, as well as the discourse that informs it. It reflects on the constant presence of failure that haunts humanitarian intervention, and argues for a more humble stance on what is possible in such situations. Humility entails meditating on human limits, both physical and mental, which serves as an important guide in determining action. It promotes a more chastened position; one that acknowledges that right intentions might not lead to just outcomes, that there are real limits on the ability of external actors to understand or control events during and following an intervention, and that our ability to comprehend such complex situations should warn against premature judgements and confident conclusions. And when failure occurs, it means not denying or avoiding it, but facing it squarely and reckoning with the consequences. The value of adopting a more humble approach will be considered through examining the 2011 Libyan intervention, a significant case for the R2P doctrine. There, success appears to have been exchanged for failure, leaving challenging and unresolved questions about what this experience means for Libya and R2P.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)433-454
    Number of pages22
    JournalMillennium: Journal of International Studies
    Volume44
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2016

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    Libya
    responsibility
    doctrine
    humanitarian intervention
    ability
    event
    discourse
    experience

    Keywords

    • classical realism
    • humility
    • Libya
    • R2P

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Political Science and International Relations
    • Sociology and Political Science

    Cite this

    Responding to Failure : The Responsibility to Protect after Libya. / Hobson, Christopher Edward.

    In: Millennium: Journal of International Studies, Vol. 44, No. 3, 2016, p. 433-454.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Hobson, Christopher Edward. / Responding to Failure : The Responsibility to Protect after Libya. In: Millennium: Journal of International Studies. 2016 ; Vol. 44, No. 3. pp. 433-454.
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