Review: Structure, function and evolution of GnIH

Kazuyoshi Tsutsui, Tomohiro Osugi, You Lee Son, Takayoshi Ubuka

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    10 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Neuropeptides that possess the Arg-Phe-NH2 motif at their C-termini (i.e., RFamide peptides) have been characterized in the nervous system of both invertebrates and vertebrates. In vertebrates, RFamide peptides make a family and consist of the groups of gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH), neuropeptide FF (NPFF), prolactin-releasing peptide (PrRP), kisspeptin (kiss1 and kiss2), and pyroglutamylated RFamide peptide/26RFamide peptide (QRFP/26RFa). It now appears that these vertebrate RFamide peptides exert important neuroendocrine, behavioral, sensory, and autonomic functions. In 2000, GnIH was discovered as a novel hypothalamic RFamide peptide inhibiting gonadotropin release in quail. Subsequent studies have demonstrated that GnIH acts on the brain and pituitary to modulate reproductive physiology and behavior across vertebrates. To clarify the origin and evolution of GnIH, the existence of GnIH was investigated in agnathans, the most ancient lineage of vertebrates, and basal chordates, such as tunicates and cephalochordates (represented by amphioxus). This review first summarizes the structure and function of GnIH and other RFamide peptides, in particular NPFF having a similar C-terminal structure of GnIH, in vertebrates. Then, this review describes the evolutionary origin of GnIH based on the studies in agnathans and basal chordates.

    Original languageEnglish
    JournalGeneral and Comparative Endocrinology
    DOIs
    Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2017

    Fingerprint

    gonadotropins
    Gonadotropins
    hormones
    Hormones
    peptides
    Vertebrates
    vertebrates
    neuropeptides
    Chordata
    Prolactin-Releasing Hormone
    gonadotropin release
    Kisspeptins
    Lancelets
    Tunicata
    Reproductive Behavior
    animal reproduction
    Urochordata
    Quail
    reproductive behavior
    quails

    Keywords

    • Agnathan
    • Chordate
    • Gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH)
    • Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH)
    • Gonadotropins
    • Molecular evolution
    • Neuropeptide FF (NPFF)
    • Reproduction
    • RFamide peptides

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Endocrinology

    Cite this

    Review : Structure, function and evolution of GnIH. / Tsutsui, Kazuyoshi; Osugi, Tomohiro; Son, You Lee; Ubuka, Takayoshi.

    In: General and Comparative Endocrinology, 2017.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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