RFamide peptides in agnathans and basal chordates

Tomohiro Osugi, You Lee Son, Takayoshi Ubuka, Honoo Satake, Kazuyoshi Tsutsui

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    9 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Since a peptide with a C-terminal Arg-Phe-NH2 (RFamide peptide) was first identified in the ganglia of the venus clam in 1977, RFamide peptides have been found in the nervous system of both invertebrates and vertebrates. In vertebrates, the RFamide peptide family includes gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH), neuropeptide FF (NPFF), prolactin-releasing peptide (PrRP), pyroglutamylated RFamide peptide/26RFamide peptide (QRFP/26RFa), and kisspeptins (kiss1 and kiss2). They are involved in important functions such as the release of hormones, regulation of sexual or social behavior, pain transmission, reproduction, and feeding. In contrast to tetrapods and jawed fish, the information available on RFamide peptides in agnathans and basal chordates is limited, thus preventing further insights into the evolution of RFamide peptides in vertebrates. In this review, we focus on the previous research and recent advances in the studies on RFamide peptides in agnathans and basal chordates. In agnathans, the genes encoding GnIH, NPFF, and PrRP precursors and the mature peptides have been identified in lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) and hagfish (Paramyxine atami). Putative kiss1 and kiss2 genes have also been found in the genome database of lamprey. In basal chordates, namely, in amphioxus (Branchiostoma japonicum), a common ancestral form of GnIH and NPFF genes and their mature peptides, as well as the ortholog of the QRFP gene have been identified. The studies revealed that the number of orthologs of vertebrate RFamide peptides present in agnathans and basal chordates is greater than expected, suggesting that the vertebrate RFamide peptides might have emerged and expanded at an early stage of chordate evolution.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)94-100
    Number of pages7
    JournalGeneral and Comparative Endocrinology
    Volume227
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2016 Feb 1

    Fingerprint

    Chordata
    peptides
    Vertebrates
    Prolactin-Releasing Hormone
    Gonadotropins
    Lancelets
    Hormones
    Lampreys
    vertebrates
    neuropeptides
    gonadotropins
    Peptides
    Genes
    hormones
    Hagfishes
    Petromyzon
    Venus
    Kisspeptins
    Petromyzontiformes
    RFamide peptide

    Keywords

    • Agnathan
    • Chordate
    • Gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH)
    • Molecular evolution
    • RFamide peptides

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Endocrinology

    Cite this

    RFamide peptides in agnathans and basal chordates. / Osugi, Tomohiro; Son, You Lee; Ubuka, Takayoshi; Satake, Honoo; Tsutsui, Kazuyoshi.

    In: General and Comparative Endocrinology, Vol. 227, 01.02.2016, p. 94-100.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Osugi, Tomohiro ; Son, You Lee ; Ubuka, Takayoshi ; Satake, Honoo ; Tsutsui, Kazuyoshi. / RFamide peptides in agnathans and basal chordates. In: General and Comparative Endocrinology. 2016 ; Vol. 227. pp. 94-100.
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